Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Shorter courses of proton therapy can be just as effective as full courses prostate cancer

08.07.2019

Penn study finds protons are effective, safe when given in higher doses

Treating prostate cancer with higher doses of proton therapy over a shorter amount of time leads to similar outcomes when compared to standard dose levels and treatments and is safe for patients, according to a new study examining the risk of long-term side-effects from the treatment.


A proton treatment room at Penn's Roberts Proton Therapy Center.

Credit: Penn Medicine

Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Roberts Proton Therapy Center examined data on non-metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with 28 doses of proton therapy instead of the standard 44 and found that the rates of cancer control at four years was the same in both groups, with notably low rates of urologic and gastrointestinal effects from the treatment at four-year follow up.

The findings, which are the first to show patient reported outcomes for shorter courses of proton therapy in prostate cancer, were published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics.

The shorter course of radiation is called hypofractionation, and previous studies have shown it can be effective with traditional photon radiation, but proton therapy has a few key differences. Photon radiation typically uses multiple x-ray beams to attack a tumor target but unavoidably deposits radiation in the normal tissues beyond the target, potentially damaging those tissues as the beam exits the body.

Proton therapy is an FDA-approved treatment that is an alternative radiation treatment. It directs positively charged protons at the tumor target, where they deposit the bulk of the radiation dose, with minimal residual radiation delivered beyond the target, potentially reducing side effects and damage to surrounding tissue.

Due to these differences, researchers point out the need for better understanding of patient outcomes for the hypofractionated approach in protons, specifically.

"Even though protons are a more targeted way to deliver radiation, we need to make sure we understand the long-term effects of giving patients a higher dose of radiation during each treatment, and our study shows it's safe," said the study's lead author Amardeep Grewal, MD, assistant chief resident in Radiation Oncology.

The study looked at data on 184 men who received hypofractionated proton therapy for prostate cancer that had not spread. At a follow up of 49 months, 96 percent (N = 179) were still alive, with none of the patient deaths related to treatment. The cumulative four-year rate of serious gastrointestinal problems was estimated at 13.6 percent, almost all of which occurred in the first two years.

Of the patients who had GI effects, 79 percent experienced rectal bleeding. The cumulative four-year rate of urologic issue was 7.6 percent. The most common issue was needing to urinate frequently. All issued resolved within six months.

"This study provides some prospective evidence that the higher daily radiation dose delivered in hypofractionated proton therapy does not negatively impact patient quality of life," said senior author Neha Vapiwala, MD, an associate professor of Radiation Oncology. "These data can help guide clinicians and patients as they weigh treatment efficacy, tolerability and convenience."

The authors say more research is needed to evaluate the differences between hypofractionated radiation with photon and proton radiation.

###

This study was supported by the Department of Defense and the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $7.8 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top medical schools in the United States for more than 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $425 million awarded in the 2018 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center--which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report--Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Medicine Princeton Health; and Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional facilities and enterprises include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, Penn Home Care and Hospice Services, Lancaster Behavioral Health Hospital, and Princeton House Behavioral Health, among others.

Penn Medicine is powered by a talented and dedicated workforce of more than 40,000 people. The organization also has alliances with top community health systems across both Southeastern Pennsylvania and Southern New Jersey, creating more options for patients no matter where they live.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2018, Penn Medicine provided more than $525 million to benefit our community.

John Infanti | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.05.069

Further reports about: Oncology Radiation prostate prostate cancer protons radiation dose

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht High-resolution 3D view inside breast tumors with opto-acoustic mesoscopy
27.05.2020 | Technische Universität München

nachricht New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI
26.05.2020 | University of California - Davis

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

Im Focus: New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

German-British Research project for even more climate protection in the rail industry

28.05.2020 | Transportation and Logistics

A special elemental magic

28.05.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Skoltech scientists get a sneak peek of a key process in battery 'life'

28.05.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>