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New ventilator joins the Oxylog family

29.04.2008
The Oxylog 2000 plus1 is the newest member of the Oxylog family of emergency and transport ventilators. The device is specifically designed for ambulance services and emergency departments, combining volume controlled ventilation with ventilation modes that support patient’s spontaneous breathing.

Now as an option, patients can also be ventilated non-invasively. The Oxylog 2000, a market mainstay for 15 years, will be phased out. The new device joins the Oxylog 1000 and 3000 family in the second quarter of 2008.


The very first Oxylog was introduced to the market 30 years ago. Based on this know-how and expertise, the new Oxylog 2000 plus emergency ventilator, developed by Dräger Medical b.v., subsidiary of Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA has responded to customer demand for more advanced ventilation possibilities in emergency care.

With the Oxylog 2000 plus emergency physicians, paramedics and EMTs (Emergency Medical Technicians) can now choose between different ventilation techniques – including the option pressure support (spontaneous breathing support) and non-invasive ventilation. Additionally, the synchronization with the patient’s breathing has been improved resulting in a minimized trigger delay.

The ventilator now has a large display which is divided into three areas. At a glance, users can see the monitored data, airway pressure and ventilation parameters. The airway pressure is displayed in the form of a bar-graph showing current and previous airway pressure measurements, breath by breath.

The Oxylog 2000 plus weighs 5.4 kg, is splash proof, and continues functioning at ambient temperatures of -20°C to +50° C. Drop tests ensure that the Oxylog 2000 plus still functions after a fall from a height of up to 75 cm.

Similar to the Oxylog 1000 and the Oxylog 3000, the Oxylog 2000 plus is built suitable for use in air ambulances and helicopters.

Following the “family-platform approach,” the Oxylog 2000 plus is compatible with the Oxylog 3000 carrying system and accessories.

About Dräger

Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA is one of the international leaders in the fields of medical and safety technology: Dräger products protect, support and save human life. Founded in 1889, in 2007 the Group achieved sales of 1,819.5 million Euro worldwide and an EBIT of 151.9 million Euro. Today, Dräger employs around 10,000 people in more than 70 subsidiaries worldwide and has representation in around 190 countries. The Dräger Medical subsidiary offers products, services and integrated system solutions which accompany the patient throughout the care process - Emergency Care, Perioperative Care, Critical Care, Perinatal Care and Home Mechanical Ventilation.

1) The device is not yet available in all countries.

Contact for Trade Press:
Birgit Diekmann
Tel.: +49 451 882 1215
E-mail: birgit.diekmann@draeger.com

Birgit Diekmann | Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA
Further information:
http://www.draeger.com

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