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Radiography system Multix Fusion from Siemens offers high-end X-ray technology for smaller budgets

29.11.2011
Siemens Healthcare introduced its new radiography system Multix Fusion at the 97th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2011.

Multix Fusion enables small and medium-size hospitals to deploy proven high-end Siemens technology without overtaxing investment budgets. The system supports the full spectrum of clinical applications, but is much more affordable than comparable predecessor models. Multix Fusion features components that until now were offered only in the upper price segments, such as the height-adjustable, 300 kilogram capacity examination table. Thanks to its high reliability and attractive service contracts, the system’s operating costs are also comparatively low.

The key components of the Multix Fusion, such as the ceiling-mounted X-ray tube and Bucky wall stand, were adopted from the high-end Ysio system. Ysio is Siemens’ radiography system for large hospitals with high patient throughput and the most demanding requirements in terms of automation, image quality, and ease-of-use. The Multix Fusion, on the other hand, is most suitable for small to medium-size hospitals and private practices that don’t want to compromise on quality, and at the same time depend on a very good price-performance ratio. This new system underscores Siemens Healthcare’s commitment to its recently launched Agenda 2013 global initiative. As an essential part of this two-year initiative, Siemens will further extend its systems portfolio in the middle price segment, demonstrating how it leads the way in health care innovation by helping to manage price pressures without sacrificing high-quality patient care.

“At times of rising cost pressure in most developed health systems, it is important to be able to offer high-quality imaging at attractive conditions. The Multix Fusion meets this requirement like almost no other system on the market,” said Andre Hartung, CEO of the X-Ray Products business unit at Siemens Healthcare. Moreover, Multix Fusion has lower operating and lifecycle costs: The system needs less than 20 square meters of installation space. Thanks to a special service contract that is configured for individual customer requirements, operating costs are further reduced.

Multix Fusion’s X-ray tube synchronizes itself automatically when the detector is adjusted, that way enabling examinations to be performed quickly and simply. A 1.8 meter long telescopic column allows the tube to be pulled down directly above the floor even in high-ceilinged rooms, so that patients no longer have to climb onto a stool or pedestal for foot images, for example. The ergonomic, height-adjustable examination table makes it easier to position patients and can hold up to 300 kilograms. Post-processing functions that have already proven their value with the Ysio radiography system, like DiamondView Plus, boost image contrast, resulting in very good image quality.

With the Multix Fusion, customers can choose among several system variants, depending on their requirements. Options range from the simplest version with ceiling-mounted tube and mobile detector, to the complete X-ray system, including table and Bucky wall stand.

Launched in November 2011, Agenda 2013 is a two-year global initiative to further strengthen the Healthcare Sector's innovative power and competitiveness. Specific measures will be implemented in four fields of action: Innovation, Competitiveness, Regional Footprint, and People Development.

The products mentioned here are not commercially available in all countries. Due to regulatory reasons the future availability in any country cannot be guaranteed. Further details are available from the local Siemens organizations.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 51,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2011 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 12.5 billion euros and profit of around 1.3 billion euros.

Sonja Fischer | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare

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