Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel technology may enable more efficient atrial fibrillation monitoring and detection

22.08.2018

A mobile heart monitor with an automated algorithm paired with a smart device and app, coupled with physician overread, can detect atrial fibrillation with excellent sensitivity and specificity, report scientists in HeartRhythm

Despite increasing awareness about atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke continues to be the first manifestation of AF in some patients. Therefore, early detection and regular heart monitoring are important for such patients. Current monitoring technology devices can be cumbersome, some are limited in duration and others are invasive, and many usually require a trip to the doctor's office. With the rise of smart phone-enabled medical peripherals, a new area of focus is ambulatory detection of AF. A study published in HeartRhythm found that a mobile heart monitor, paired with a smart device and an app, and supported by an automated algorithm can effectively and accurately detect AF, especially when supported by physician overread.


The KMCM mobile monitoring device records a rhythm strip using a smartphone app.

Credit: AliveCor


A look at the KMCM smartphone app that allows patients to securely send their rhythm strips to their physician.

Credit: AliveCor

The Kardia Mobile Cardiac Monitor (KMCM) is a small two-electrode cardiac rhythm recorder that hooks up to a smart device. It enables patients to record a 30-second rhythm strip. In this study, scientists ran the data collected by the devices through KMCM's new automated rhythm analysis, which uses an algorithm specifically developed to detect AF.

Investigators designed the study to directly compare the results obtained from the mobile monitoring to that of a traditional 12-lead ECG recording analyzed by a doctor. AF patients underwent almost simultaneous recording by both the mobile monitoring device and a traditional ECG. When the results were compared, they found that when the conditions were met for the automated rhythm analysis to provide a diagnosis, it had 96.6 percent sensitivity and 94.1 percent specificity for AF detection compared to physician-interpreted ECGs.

"This study is the first independent validation of this smartphone monitor system in the clinical setting using near simultaneous 12-lead ECGs," said lead investigator Khaldoun G. Tarakji, MD, MPH, Section of Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. "In addition to providing an instantaneous rhythm interpretation, this smartphone monitor system is able to transmit a recording to a secure server where the recordings can be directly reviewed."

The false negative detection rate was low (3.4 percent); however, the automated system failed to classify some of the results as either "Normal" or "Possible AF." When these results were analyzed by investigators, they found that the majority of these "unclassified" readings fell outside the predefined bounds for the algorithm (e.g., the recordings were less than 30 seconds in duration, the heart rate recorded was under 50 beats per minute [bpm] or over 100 bpm, or that there was too much noise during the rhythm capture).

"Given the predefined algorithm operating parameters and high rate of "unclassified" recordings with resultant missed AF instances, this smartphone monitor's algorithm is not suited to be a replacement for physician analysis," noted Dr. Tarakji. "However, given its highly accurate performance when able to provide an interpretation, it holds potential as an adjunct to clinical decision making. Patients can use an automated AF detection as a basis for pursuing additional medical follow-up, and clinicians may use it to develop treatment plans supported by more objective data rather than relying only on symptoms."

Study participants found the KMCM device and app easy to use. Having access to a mobile monitoring device also helped ease anxiety related to their AF diagnosis. Investigators hope that in the future, these types of smart device apps and devices will help doctors and patients form more of a care partnership, in which they can work together as a team to monitor chronic conditions like AF.

"The ability to record your own rhythm strip and directly visualize it and share it with your physician was fictional up until a few years ago. We live in an exciting era in which technology is evolving at an unprecedented pace. As a medical community, we have a duty to test these products, assess their accuracy, and more importantly, examine their ability to change outcomes. Abundance of data could become noise if it does not come with guidance about proper management of the information. Our obligation through proper clinical studies is to provide guidance about the best use of these tools. As physicians, we should not view these products as threats, but rather as an opportunity to provide better and more effective care for our patients," concluded Dr. Tarakji.

Media Contact

Jane Grochowski
hmsmedia@elsevier.com
406-542-8397

 @elseviernews

http://www.elsevier.com 

Jane Grochowski | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.06.037

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht MoreGrasp: significant research results in the field of thought-controlled grasp neuroprosthetics
17.09.2018 | Technische Universität Graz

nachricht Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body
13.09.2018 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists present new observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics

The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture. After the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, matter consisted mainly of quarks and gluons, two types of elementary particles whose interactions are governed by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interaction. In the early universe, these particles moved (nearly) freely in a quark-gluon plasma.

This is a joint press release of University Muenster and Heidelberg as well as the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

Then, in a phase transition, they combined and formed hadrons, among them the building blocks of atomic nuclei, protons and neutrons. In the current issue of...

Im Focus: Patented nanostructure for solar cells: Rough optics, smooth surface

Thin-film solar cells made of crystalline silicon are inexpensive and achieve efficiencies of a good 14 percent. However, they could do even better if their shiny surfaces reflected less light. A team led by Prof. Christiane Becker from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has now patented a sophisticated new solution to this problem.

"It is not enough simply to bring more light into the cell," says Christiane Becker. Such surface structures can even ultimately reduce the efficiency by...

Im Focus: New soft coral species discovered in Panama

A study in the journal Bulletin of Marine Science describes a new, blood-red species of octocoral found in Panama. The species in the genus Thesea was discovered in the threatened low-light reef environment on Hannibal Bank, 60 kilometers off mainland Pacific Panama, by researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama (STRI) and the Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (CIMAR) at the University of Costa Rica.

Scientists established the new species, Thesea dalioi, by comparing its physical traits, such as branch thickness and the bright red colony color, with the...

Im Focus: New devices based on rust could reduce excess heat in computers

Physicists explore long-distance information transmission in antiferromagnetic iron oxide

Scientists have succeeded in observing the first long-distance transfer of information in a magnetic group of materials known as antiferromagnets.

Im Focus: Finding Nemo's genes

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome, providing the research community with an invaluable resource to decode the response of fish to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

"Boston calling": TU Berlin and the Weizenbaum Institute organize a conference in USA

21.09.2018 | Event News

One of the world’s most prominent strategic forums for global health held in Berlin in October 2018

03.09.2018 | Event News

4th Intelligent Materials - European Symposium on Intelligent Materials

27.08.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light

24.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

24.09.2018 | Earth Sciences

New way to target advanced breast cancers

24.09.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>