Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel technology may enable more efficient atrial fibrillation monitoring and detection

22.08.2018

A mobile heart monitor with an automated algorithm paired with a smart device and app, coupled with physician overread, can detect atrial fibrillation with excellent sensitivity and specificity, report scientists in HeartRhythm

Despite increasing awareness about atrial fibrillation (AF), stroke continues to be the first manifestation of AF in some patients. Therefore, early detection and regular heart monitoring are important for such patients. Current monitoring technology devices can be cumbersome, some are limited in duration and others are invasive, and many usually require a trip to the doctor's office. With the rise of smart phone-enabled medical peripherals, a new area of focus is ambulatory detection of AF. A study published in HeartRhythm found that a mobile heart monitor, paired with a smart device and an app, and supported by an automated algorithm can effectively and accurately detect AF, especially when supported by physician overread.


The KMCM mobile monitoring device records a rhythm strip using a smartphone app.

Credit: AliveCor


A look at the KMCM smartphone app that allows patients to securely send their rhythm strips to their physician.

Credit: AliveCor

The Kardia Mobile Cardiac Monitor (KMCM) is a small two-electrode cardiac rhythm recorder that hooks up to a smart device. It enables patients to record a 30-second rhythm strip. In this study, scientists ran the data collected by the devices through KMCM's new automated rhythm analysis, which uses an algorithm specifically developed to detect AF.

Investigators designed the study to directly compare the results obtained from the mobile monitoring to that of a traditional 12-lead ECG recording analyzed by a doctor. AF patients underwent almost simultaneous recording by both the mobile monitoring device and a traditional ECG. When the results were compared, they found that when the conditions were met for the automated rhythm analysis to provide a diagnosis, it had 96.6 percent sensitivity and 94.1 percent specificity for AF detection compared to physician-interpreted ECGs.

"This study is the first independent validation of this smartphone monitor system in the clinical setting using near simultaneous 12-lead ECGs," said lead investigator Khaldoun G. Tarakji, MD, MPH, Section of Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology, Heart and Vascular Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. "In addition to providing an instantaneous rhythm interpretation, this smartphone monitor system is able to transmit a recording to a secure server where the recordings can be directly reviewed."

The false negative detection rate was low (3.4 percent); however, the automated system failed to classify some of the results as either "Normal" or "Possible AF." When these results were analyzed by investigators, they found that the majority of these "unclassified" readings fell outside the predefined bounds for the algorithm (e.g., the recordings were less than 30 seconds in duration, the heart rate recorded was under 50 beats per minute [bpm] or over 100 bpm, or that there was too much noise during the rhythm capture).

"Given the predefined algorithm operating parameters and high rate of "unclassified" recordings with resultant missed AF instances, this smartphone monitor's algorithm is not suited to be a replacement for physician analysis," noted Dr. Tarakji. "However, given its highly accurate performance when able to provide an interpretation, it holds potential as an adjunct to clinical decision making. Patients can use an automated AF detection as a basis for pursuing additional medical follow-up, and clinicians may use it to develop treatment plans supported by more objective data rather than relying only on symptoms."

Study participants found the KMCM device and app easy to use. Having access to a mobile monitoring device also helped ease anxiety related to their AF diagnosis. Investigators hope that in the future, these types of smart device apps and devices will help doctors and patients form more of a care partnership, in which they can work together as a team to monitor chronic conditions like AF.

"The ability to record your own rhythm strip and directly visualize it and share it with your physician was fictional up until a few years ago. We live in an exciting era in which technology is evolving at an unprecedented pace. As a medical community, we have a duty to test these products, assess their accuracy, and more importantly, examine their ability to change outcomes. Abundance of data could become noise if it does not come with guidance about proper management of the information. Our obligation through proper clinical studies is to provide guidance about the best use of these tools. As physicians, we should not view these products as threats, but rather as an opportunity to provide better and more effective care for our patients," concluded Dr. Tarakji.

Media Contact

Jane Grochowski
hmsmedia@elsevier.com
406-542-8397

 @elseviernews

http://www.elsevier.com 

Jane Grochowski | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2018.06.037

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Highly sensitive sensors to measure the heart and brain activity
20.09.2019 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Motion pictures from living cells: Research team from Jena and Bielefeld improves superresolution microscopy
20.09.2019 | Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e. V.

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time

How long the battery of your phone or computer lasts depends on how many lithium ions can be stored in the battery's negative electrode material. If the battery runs out of these ions, it can't generate an electrical current to run a device and ultimately fails.

Materials with a higher lithium ion storage capacity are either too heavy or the wrong shape to replace graphite, the electrode material currently used in...

Im Focus: Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Photons interact on chip-based system with unprecedented efficiency

To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the...

Im Focus: Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in the city have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starting enzymatic reactions by mixing a cocktail of small amounts of liquids with protein crystals. Determination of the protein structures at different times after mixing can be assembled into a time-lapse sequence that shows the molecular foundations of biology.

The functions of biomolecules are determined by their motions and structural changes. Yet it is a formidable challenge to understand these dynamic motions.

Im Focus: Modular OLED light strips

At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

Almost everyone is familiar with light strips for interior design. LED strips are available by the metre in DIY stores around the corner and are just as often...

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quality control in immune communication: Chaperones detect immature signaling molecules in the immune system

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Moderately Common Plants Show Highest Relative Losses

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

The Fluid Fingerprint of Hurricanes

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>