Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New China and US studies back use of pulse oximeters for assessing blood pressure

21.11.2018

Fast and easy blood pressure monitoring could soon be at your fingertips--literally--thanks to new University of British Columbia research that showed BP can be assessed by a fingertip oximeter, a tool not generally used for that purpose.

"We found that the oximeter, which clips on to a finger or toe to measure heart rate and the amount of oxygen in the blood, can detect normal, elevated or high blood pressure with up to 95 per cent accuracy," said lead researcher Mohamed Elgendi, an adjunct professor of electrical and computer engineering at UBC.


Hypertension is linked to higher risks for heart disease and stroke.

Credit: Mohamed Elgendi/UBC


This is researcher Mohamed Elgendi.

Credit: UBC

"This suggests that it can, with a few tweaks, do double duty as a BP monitor in the future."

Hypertension or high blood pressure is linked to 1,100 deaths each day in the U.S. alone, so it's critical to regularly monitor people at risk. The challenge is that current BP monitoring methods have their limitations.

"While the inflatable cuff is easy to use, its accuracy depends on its placement on the arm and the observer's skill," said Elgendi. "Another technique, intra-arterial blood pressure measurement, is highly accurate but invasive, requiring the doctor to insert a needle into an artery."

Past studies have explored using oximeters for blood pressure assessment, but the UBC study is the first to provide supportive evidence based on actual patient records and the first to examine large sample sizes obtained in two different countries, according to Elgendi.

For their analysis, the UBC team examined oximeter records from 121 patients registered at a hospital in Boston, and 219 admitted to a hospital in the Chinese province of Guilin. They ran the oximeter information through a unique mathematical program they had developed, and found nine electrical signatures, or patterns, that correlated significantly with hypertension.

"The consistent presence of these patterns in data collected from two different countries proves that the pulse oximeter is a reliable tool for hypertension assessment," said Elgendi, a postdoctoral fellow in the faculty of medicine at UBC and at BC Women's Hospital. "When we added electrocardiogram data to oximeter data, we were able to improve the detection of pre-hypertension."

Blood pressure is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg) with the systolic number recorded first, followed by the diastolic number. Normal blood pressure is under 120/80 mmHg, elevated blood pressure or pre-hypertension is between 121/80 mmHg and 139/89 mmHg, and high blood pressure or hypertension is 140/90 mmHg or higher. Pre-hypertension increases the risk of heart disease, so early detection is vital for diagnosis and treatment.

Elgendi and his team are working on replicating their studies on other groups of patients over the next several months. They're also refining their algorithm so that it can be used on a larger scale by oximeter manufacturers.

"With the addition of our algorithm and a few other changes, it's entirely feasible to produce a science-based oximeter that provides highly accurate blood pressure assessment--hopefully contributing to faster detection of hypertension and potentially saving lives," said Elgendi.

###

The research was described recently in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, Biosensors, Diagnostics, and Scientific Data. (LINKS follow)

Clinical Medicine: https://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/7/10/316

Biosensors: https://www.mdpi.com/2079-6374/8/4/101

Diagnostics: https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4418/8/3/65/htm

Scientific Data: https://www.nature.com/articles/sdata201876

Media Contact

Lou Bosshart
lou.bosshart@ubc.ca
604-999-0473

 @UBCnews

http://www.ubc.ca 

Lou Bosshart | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm7100316

Further reports about: Biosensors Hypertension Medicine blood pressure high blood pressure oximeter

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Correcting presbyopia with the laser
06.02.2019 | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

nachricht New technology gives unprecedented look inside capillaries
28.01.2019 | Northwestern University

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Spintronics by 'straintronics'

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

15.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>