Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A first look at interstitial fluid flow in the brain

05.07.2018

A team of researchers have developed a new method to investigate the link between interstitial fluid flow and brain tumors.

Interstitial fluid transports nutrients and removes waste between the organs and tissues in our body. In the brain, interstitial fluid is thought to be composed of circulating cerebrospinal fluid, cellular waste and blood plasma, and past research has shown a link between interstitial fluid flow and an increased invasion rate of glioblastoma, or brain tumor, cells.


This MRI with contrast shows heterogenous interstitial fluid flow in glioblastoma. The tumor border is outlined in red.

Credit: Kingsmore et al.

A team of biomedical researchers and electrical engineers from the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech recently developed a new method to measure and reconstruct interstitial fluid flow velocities in the brain.

This method gives researchers a first look at interstitial fluid flow dynamics in glioma models, and the technique can readily translate to clinical models already using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The team describes their method in a special issue focusing on the "Bioengineering of Cancer" in APL Bioengineering, by AIP Publishing.

The team built on an existing dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI technique that's already frequently used in clinics to track tumor growth and movement. "We are excited about our technique because we could potentially translate it to patient data that already exists and look at interstitial fluid motion in those patients," said Jennifer Munson, a lead author on the paper.

Munson touted the team's rigorous validation approach in silico and in vitro. First, the team developed an in vitro model of interstitial fluid flow moving through extracellular space by placing fluid on top of a hydrogel and using MRI to measure how the fluid flowed from top to bottom. Then, they validated their computational model against their experimental measurements.

To further validate their technique, Daniel Abler and Russell Rockne, who are co-authors on the paper, created phantom fluid "flow field," in a computer and then reconstructed that flow using their new imaging methodology. Finally, the team implanted patient-derived glioma cells in mice and examined the mouse tumors using MRI to visualize a real flow field.

The team was surprised to find high variability in the flow's rate and magnitude. "There's been this classical idea that a tumor develops and there's this equivalent flow rate going out in all directions like a sphere," Munson said. "Our method and our visualization approach and modeling show that that's a large oversimplification and we have a very heterogenous system. Sometimes flow is going out, or in, or along the side."

One day, this technique could potentially help researchers predict how a tumor might grow and, therefore, improve cancer treatments. More immediately, the team plans to use their established method "to understand the relationship between the fluid velocities and the growth of the tumors," Munson said.

###

The article, "MRI analysis to map interstitial flow in the brain tumor microenvironment," is authored by Kathryn M. Kingsmore, Andrea Vaccari, Daniel Abler, Sophia X. Cui, Frederick H. Epstein, Russell C. Rockne, Scott T. Acton and Jennifer M. Munson. The article appeared in APL Bioengineering June 26, 2018, (10.1063/1.5023503) and can be accessed at http://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1063/1.5023503.

ABOUT THE JOURNAL

APL Bioengineering is devoted to research at the intersection of biology, physics, and engineering. The journal publishes high-impact manuscripts specific to the understanding and advancement of physics and engineering of biological systems. APL Bioengineering is the new home for the bioengineering and biomedical research communities. See https://aip.scitation.org/journal/apb.

Media Contact

Julia Majors
media@aip.org
301-209-3090

 @AIPPhysicsNews

http://www.aip.org 

Julia Majors | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.5023503

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Novel PET imaging method could track and guide therapy for type 1 diabetes
03.08.2018 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

nachricht A sentinel to watch over ocular pressure
04.07.2018 | Fraunhofer Institute for Microelectronic Circuits and Systems

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

Im Focus: World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

The quality of materials often depends on the manufacturing process. In casting and welding, for example, the rate at which melts solidify and the resulting microstructure of the alloy is important. With metallic foams as well, it depends on exactly how the foaming process takes place. To understand these processes fully requires fast sensing capability. The fastest 3D tomographic images to date have now been achieved at the BESSY II X-ray source operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

Dr. Francisco Garcia-Moreno and his team have designed a turntable that rotates ultra-stably about its axis at a constant rotational speed. This really depends...

Im Focus: A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz- Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases. The results of the study have just been published in the prestigious scientific journal 'Molecular Cell'.

Cell growth and cell differentiation as well as the release and efficacy of hormones such as insulin depend on the presence of lipids. Lipids are small...

Im Focus: Touring IPP’s fusion devices per virtual-reality viewer

ASDEX Upgrade and Wendelstein 7-X – as if you were there / 360° view of fusion research

You seem to be standing in the plasma vessel looking around: Where otherwise plasmas with temperatures of several million degrees are being investigated, with...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ph.D. student develops spinning heat shield for future spacecraft

10.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Investigating global air pollution

10.08.2018 | Life Sciences

The “TRiC” to folding actin

10.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>