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Laser rescue system for serious accidents

29.11.2016

Better technology and modern materials increase the traffic safety and save human life. But they pose totally new challenges for the emergency personnel at the accident site. Because today, tools like hydraulic rescue cutters more and more often reach their limits. A mobile laser unit for rescue missions shall solve this problem. The Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH), six project partners and eight associated partners have teamed up to develop this system.

In the past 25 years, the number of road traffic deaths has been drastically reduced, and the number of severely injured persons decreased significantly, too. Among others, the declining figures are due to improved passive safety. The use of high-tensile steel and composite materials adds to this.


Conventional rescue systems more and more often reach their limits with modern materials.

Photo: Stadt Dortmund – Institut für Feuerwehr- und Rettungstechnologie


The chances for rescue are much higher the faster a person can be freed from the vehicle.

Photo: Stadt Dortmund – Institut für Feuerwehr- und Rettungstechnologie

Time as a decisive factor

The higher vehicle stability achieved by using these materials, however, becomes a problem in the event of an accident. Because the available rescue systems, such as power, plasma or hydraulic rescue cutters require a lot of time to cut the car body, or they even fail in individual cases. Time, however, is crucial during a rescue mission. The faster a person is freed, the higher the chances to survive.

Using the laser at the accident site

This is where the project comes in: A compact laser unit shall be developed that can be used when conventional rescue tools reach their limits. With this system it shall be possible to cut modern materials in a short time, or to broach them so that they can be cut faster with conventional tools.

Moreover, it shall be investigated within the scope of the project how the safe use of the laser at the accident site can be guaranteed. Here, it is also being checked, for example, which shut-off devices are required for the system. In addition, the scientists evaluate which measures must be taken to protect the rescue team, the accident victim and uninvolved third parties. This includes curtains, mats and protection glasses.

Diversified consortium

The partners from many different sectors ensure that all relevant aspects are considered. Project partners of the LZH are: Coherent (Deutschland) GmbH, SGE Spezialgeräteentwicklung GmbH, WEBER-HYDRAULIK GmbH, eifeler Lasertechnik GmbH, LASERVISION GmbH & Co. KG and Stadt Dortmund – Institut für Feuerwehr- und Rettungstechnologie.

Associated project partners are: Bundesanstalt für Arbeitsschutz und -medizin, Berufsgenossenschaft Energie Textil Elektro Medienerzeugnisse, DB Fahrzeuginstandhaltung GmbH, DEKRA Automobil GmbH, GuS – Präzision in Kunststoff, Glas und Optik GmbH & Co. KG, Bundesanstalt Technisches Hilfswerk, Unfallkasse NRW and Volkswagen AG.

The project is being sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) within the scope of the program “Civil safety – innovative rescue and safety systems” until October 2019.

Dr. Nadine Tinne | Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.
Further information:
http://www.lzh.de/

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