Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Economic and effective security design

04.05.2015

Operators of infrastructures such as power grids and airports are expected to ensure a high level of security – but their financial means are limited. Fraunhofer researchers have developed an analysis tool for evaluating the effectiveness and economic viability of different security measures as part of an EU-funded project.

Storms are capable of paralyzing entire cities. Only recently, in the first week of April, large parts of Germany were deprived of power due to hurricane-force winds. Rail services were cancelled, elevators were blocked, and computer screens went blank.


Measures to assure the security of rail stations and other public infrastructures have a high priority.

© Fraunhofer ISST

Such extreme weather events often subside as quickly as they arrive but their effects reveal the Achilles heel of modern society, namely our dependence on critical infrastructures such as the power grid. Hence the urgent need for effective security measures. Other public infrastructures, such as airports and road networks, are similarly in need of increased security.

“Quite simply, all operators of critical infrastructures want to increase security in order to ward off acts of sabotage and other malicious attacks. At the same time, they also have to make sure such measures are cost effective,” says Prof. Jan Jürjens of the Fraunhofer Institute for Software and Systems Engineering ISST, describing the basic dilemma.

Researchers at the Dortmund-based institute have teamed up with international partners in the EU’s SECONOMICS project to develop an analysis tool that will enable infrastructure operators to evaluate existing and planned security measures in terms of their effectiveness and cost-efficiency. “Our system provides a founded basis for decisions that will enable users to optimize their security without over-stretching their financial resources,” says Jürjens.

Software provides a graphical map of security-related weak points

The starting point is a customized risk analysis of the current situation. The ISST researchers have developed a model-based software solution containing scenarios for different infrastructures. “After studying the security-related aspects identified during site visits, we put together a set of mathematical algorithms that allow us to determine their interrelationship,” explains Jürjens.

In the case of airports, for example, relevant parameters include the number of security checks, the human resources available, and imposed security regulations such as the presence of liquids in carry-on baggage. In order to tailor the analysis to specific circumstances, the user enters data concerning each of these factors via the user interface – for example staffing levels at the security gate.

The risk analysis software uses these data to create a model scenario and present the results in the form of a graphical diagram. As well as revealing existing weak points, this simulation can also be used to verify the effectiveness and cost-efficiency of planned security measures by varying different parameters, for instance by increasing the number of available personnel. This type of walk-through analysis helps to predict the effect of individual measures on overall security and calculate the necessary investments.

In addition to finding a smart way of correlating the various security aspects, the scientists were also faced with the challenge of managing large quantities of heterogeneous data. “Evaluating the effectiveness of security measures involves factoring in a large number of individual components – a process that, in order to be user-friendly, requires fast processing speeds,” says Jürjens. This is where the ISST’s many years of experience in big data management has proved to be an advantage.

The analysis tool has already demonstrated its practical use in case studies conducted by the project partners, including the evaluation of a U.K. power supply network, Barcelona’s subway system, and a Turkish airport. The software has also been in use for many years at Fraunhofer ISST for consultations with research clients. The project’s final results were recently presented in Brussels. A number of new scenarios are being prepared and, in a next step, the project partners aim to produce a marketable version of their virtual toolbox.

Britta Klocke | Fraunhofer Research News
Further information:
http://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2015/may/economic-and-effective-security-design.html

More articles from Transportation and Logistics:

nachricht German-British Research project for even more climate protection in the rail industry
28.05.2020 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Delivery drones instead of postal vans?
22.04.2020 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Transportation and Logistics >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

Im Focus: New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

Im Focus: I-call - When microimplants communicate with each other / Innovation driver digitization - "Smart Health“

Microelectronics as a key technology enables numerous innovations in the field of intelligent medical technology. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT coordinates the BMBF cooperative project "I-call" realizing the first electronic system for ultrasound-based, safe and interference-resistant data transmission between implants in the human body.

When microelectronic systems are used for medical applications, they have to meet high requirements in terms of biocompatibility, reliability, energy...

Im Focus: When predictions of theoretical chemists become reality

Thomas Heine, Professor of Theoretical Chemistry at TU Dresden, together with his team, first predicted a topological 2D polymer in 2019. Only one year later, an international team led by Italian researchers was able to synthesize these materials and experimentally prove their topological properties. For the renowned journal Nature Materials, this was the occasion to invite Thomas Heine to a News and Views article, which was published this week. Under the title "Making 2D Topological Polymers a reality" Prof. Heine describes how his theory became a reality.

Ultrathin materials are extremely interesting as building blocks for next generation nano electronic devices, as it is much easier to make circuits and other...

Im Focus: Rolling into the deep

Scientists took a leukocyte as the blueprint and developed a microrobot that has the size, shape and moving capabilities of a white blood cell. Simulating a blood vessel in a laboratory setting, they succeeded in magnetically navigating the ball-shaped microroller through this dynamic and dense environment. The drug-delivery vehicle withstood the simulated blood flow, pushing the developments in targeted drug delivery a step further: inside the body, there is no better access route to all tissues and organs than the circulatory system. A robot that could actually travel through this finely woven web would revolutionize the minimally-invasive treatment of illnesses.

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) in Stuttgart invented a tiny microrobot that resembles a white blood cell...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biophysicists reveal how optogenetic tool works

29.05.2020 | Life Sciences

Convenient location of a near-threshold proton-emitting resonance in 11B

29.05.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors

29.05.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>