Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

TSRI scientists find key proteins control risk of osteoarthritis during aging

15.02.2018

More than 30 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis making it one of the most common age-related diseases.

Now, a study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) explains why the risk of osteoarthritis increases as we age and offers a potential avenue for developing new therapies to maintain healthy joints.


These are images of knee joints from control and FoxO deficient mice. The areas in red are joint cartilage which is destroyed in FoxO deficient mice after treadmill running.

Credit: Lotz Lab, The Scripps Research Institute

The study's findings suggest that FOXO proteins are responsible for the maintenance of healthy cells in the cartilage of our joints.

"We discovered that FoxO transcription factors control the expression of genes that are essential for maintaining joint health," says Martin Lotz, MD, a TSRI professor and senior author of the study, published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. "Drugs that boost the expression and activity of FoxO could be a strategy for preventing and treating osteoarthritis."

Previous research from Lotz' lab showed that as joints age, levels of FoxO proteins in cartilage decrease. Lotz and his colleagues had also found that people with osteoarthritis have a lower expression of the genes needed for a process called autophagy. Autophagy ("auto" meaning "self" and "phagy" meaning "to eat") is a cell's way of removing and recycling its own damaged structures to stay healthy.

For the new study, researchers used mouse models with FoxO deficiency in cartilage to see how the FoxO proteins affect maintenance of cartilage throughout adulthood.

The researchers noticed a striking difference in the mice with "knockout" FoxO deficiency. Their cartilage degenerated at much younger age than in control mice. The FoxO-deficient mice also had more severe forms of post-traumatic osteoarthritis induced by meniscus damage (an injury to the knee), and these mice were more vulnerable to cartilage damage during treadmill running.

The culprit? The FoxO-deficient mice had defects in autophagy and in mechanisms that protect cells from damage by molecules called oxidants. Specific to cartilage, FoxO-deficient mice did not produce enough lubricin, a lubricating protein that normally protects the cartilage from friction and wear. This lack of lubricin was associated with a loss of healthy cells in a cartilage layer of the knee joint called the superficial zone.

These problems all came down to how FoxO proteins work as transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Without FoxO proteins running the show, expression of inflammation-related genes skyrockets, causing pain, while levels of autophagy-related genes plummet, leaving cells without a way to repair themselves.

"The housekeeping mechanisms, which keeps cells healthy, were not working in these knockout mice," Lotz explains.

To determine whether targeting FoxO has therapeutic benefits, the investigators used genetic approaches to increase FoxO expression in cells of humans with osteoarthritis and found that the levels of lubricin and protective genes returned to normal.

The next step in this research is to develop molecules that enhance FoxO and test them in experimental models of osteoarthritis.

###

Additional authors of the study, "FoxO transcription factors modulate autophagy and proteoglycan 4 in cartilage homeostasis and osteoarthritis," were Tokio Matsuzaki, Oscar Alvarez-Garcia, Sho Mokuda, Keita Nagira, Merissa Olmer, Ramya Gamini, Kohei Miyata, Yukio Akasaki Andrew Su and Hiroshi Asahara of The Scripps Research Institute.

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grants AG007996, AR049617 and AR505631.)

About The Scripps Research Institute

The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists--including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering or Medicine--work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. In October 2016, TSRI announced a strategic affiliation with the California Institute for Biomedical Research (Calibr), representing a renewed commitment to the discovery and development of new medicines to address unmet medical needs. For more information, see http://www.scripps.edu.

Media Contact

Madeline McCurry-Schmidt
madms@scripps.edu
858-784-9254

 @scrippsresearch

http://www.scripps.edu 

Madeline McCurry-Schmidt | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: FoxO proteins TSRI key proteins osteoarthritis risk of osteoarthritis

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The Secret of the Rock Drawings
24.05.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie

nachricht Chemical juggling with three particles
24.05.2019 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature

A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

The most complete assessment ever of statistical uncertainty within the GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP) data product shows that the annual values...

Im Focus: The geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical Review Letters and the related theory in Physical Review B.

The spin of an electron is a promising candidate for use as the smallest information unit (qubit) of a quantum computer. Controlling and switching this spin or...

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

On Mars, sands shift to a different drum

24.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema

24.05.2019 | Medical Engineering

Chemical juggling with three particles

24.05.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>