Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Toll-like receptors play role in brain damage in newborns

23.11.2011
Two out of every thousand babies are at risk of brain damage in connection with birth. Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have identified mechanisms behind these injuries, which could lead to better treatment and a richer life for the infants affected.

Roughly two in every thousand babies are at risk of suffering brain damage as a result of events before, during and after delivery. Infections in the blood or a reduced supply of oxygen and blood can lead to inflammation in the brain, causing injury. This type of brain damage, which is much more common in premature babies, can result in neurological problems such as cerebral palsy, learning difficulties and epilepsy.

Toll-like receptors

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy have now found that toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the innate immune system play a major role in the state of the brain in newborns. The discovery could lead to better treatment and a richer life for many children.

Key role in the immature brain

Research into TLRs, which was rewarded with this year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, has previously shown that these receptors are involved in stroke-related brain damage in adults. The researchers in Gothenburg have now shown that TLRs are also present in the immature brain and play an important role there.

“By understanding the role of toll-like receptors in the inflammatory process following brain injury, we hope eventually to find more effective treatment strategies,” says Linnea Stridh from the Sahlgrenska Academy, who presents the results in her thesis.

Simulated brain injuries

Stridh and her colleagues used mice in their studies to simulate the brain injuries seen in newborn babies. They found that special TLRs contribute to brain damage following hypoxia, where the brain is starved of oxygen.
“An infection can activate these receptors, making the brain more sensitive to hypoxia, resulting in worse brain damage,” Stridh explains. “If these signals are blocked, the degree of brain damage is reduced.”

Barrier opened

In her thesis, Stridh also looks at a protein called occludin, which has the role of gluing together cells in the blood-brain barrier.

“Our results show that there is a reduction in occludin at a genetic level following infection,” she explains. “This can lead to the opening of the barrier, making it easier for inflammatory molecules and cells in the blood to get into the brain and cause inflammation.”

The thesis “Inflammation in the immature brain; the role of toll-like receptors” was defended on 11 November 2011. neuro

TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are found on both the outside and inside of cells where they specialise in detecting specific molecules from hostile microorganisms. When a TLR detects a microorganism, the innate immune system is activated, causing inflammation to destroy the microorganism. Research on Toll-like receptors was awarded with the Nobel Prize in medicine 2012.

Bibliographi data:
Title: Regulation of Toll-like receptor 1 and -2 in neonatal mouse brain after hypoxia-ischemia
Authors: Linnea Stridh, Peter L.P. Smith, Andrew S Naylor, Xiaoyang Wang and Carina Mallard J.
Journal: Neuroinflammation 2011, 8:45
Link to article: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uid...
For more information, please contact: Linnea Stridh
Telephone: +46 (0)31 7863377
Mobile: +46 (0)705 764718
E-mail: linnea.stridh@neuro.gu.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se
http://gupea.ub.gu.se/handle/2077/27809

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht First use of vasoprotective antibody in cardiogenic shock
17.05.2019 | Deutsches Zentrum für Herz-Kreislauf-Forschung e.V.

nachricht A nerve cell serves as a “single” for studies
15.05.2019 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

Im Focus: A step towards probabilistic computing

Working group led by physicist Professor Ulrich Nowak at the University of Konstanz, in collaboration with a team of physicists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, demonstrates how skyrmions can be used for the computer concepts of the future

When it comes to performing a calculation destined to arrive at an exact result, humans are hopelessly inferior to the computer. In other areas, humans are...

Im Focus: Recording embryonic development

Scientists develop a molecular recording tool that enables in vivo lineage tracing of embryonic cells

The beginning of new life starts with a fascinating process: A single cell gives rise to progenitor cells that eventually differentiate into the three germ...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Discovering unusual structures from exception using big data and machine learning techniques

17.05.2019 | Materials Sciences

ALMA discovers aluminum around young star

17.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

A new iron-based superconductor stabilized by inter-block charger transfer

17.05.2019 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>