Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The secret of mushroom colors

02.07.2019

Mushrooms: Darker fruiting bodies in cold climates

The fly agaric with its red hat is perhaps the most evocative of the diverse and variously colored mushroom species. Hitherto, the purpose of these colors was shrouded in mystery.


Über 3000 Pilzarten wurden im Rahmen der Untersuchung analysiert, darunter: Elfenbeinschneckling (1. Reihe v.l.), Blutblättriger Hautkopf, Dunkler Rasenrötling, Safrangelber Saftling (2. Reihe v.l.), Papageiensaftling, Violetter Lacktrichterling, Olivgelber Holzritterling (3. Reihe v.l.), Maronen-Röhrling, Fliegenpilz.

Bild: Franz Krah, Peter Karasch/Nationalpark Bayerischer Wald

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), in collaboration with the Bavarian Forest National Park, have now put together the first pieces of this puzzle.

In nature, specific colors and patterns normally serve a purpose: The eye-catching patterns of the fire salamander convey to its enemies that it is poisonous. Red cherries presumably attract birds that eat them and thus disperse their seed.

Other animals such as chameleons use camouflage coloring to protect themselves from discovery by predators.

But climate also plays a role in coloration: Especially insects and reptiles tend to be darker in colder climates. Cold-blooded animals rely on the ambient temperature to regulate their body temperature. Dark coloration allows them to absorb heat faster.

The same mechanism could also play a role in fungi, as the research team of Franz Krah, who wrote his doctoral thesis on the topic at TUM and Dr. Claus Bässler, mycologist at the TUM and coworker in the Bavarian Forest National Park suspect. Mushrooms might benefit from solar energy to improve their reproduction, as well.

Distribution of 3054 fungus species studied

To test their theory, the researchers combed through vast volumes of data. They investigated the distribution of 3054 species of fungi throughout Europe. In the process, they analyzed the lightness of their coloration and the prevailing climatic conditions in the respective habitats. The results showed a clear correlation: Fungal communities have darker mushrooms in cold climates. The scientists also accounted for seasonal changes. They discovered that fungal communities that decompose dead plant constituents are darker in spring and autumn than in summer.

"Of course, this is just the beginning," explains Krah. "It will take much more research before we develop a comprehensive understanding of mushroom colors." For example, further seasonal coloring effects cannot be detected in fungi that live in symbiosis with trees. "Here, other coloration functions, such as camouflage, also play a role." The researchers also need to study the degree to which dark coloration influences the reproductive rate of fungi.
Publications:

Franz-Sebastian Krah et al., Nature Communications Volumes 10, Article Number: 2890 (2019) "European mushroom assemblages are darker in cold climates."
www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-10767-z

Contacts to this article:

Technical University of Munich
Plant Biodiversity Research Group

Dr. Franz Krah
franz.krah(at)tum.de

Prof. Hanno Schaefer
Tel: 0816171-5884
hanno.schaefer(at)tum.de

Dr. Ulrich Marsch | Technische Universität München

Further reports about: TUM body temperature camouflage cold climates coloration fungi mushroom volumes of data

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species
03.07.2020 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

nachricht Moss protein corrects genetic defects of other plants
03.07.2020 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

Im Focus: ILA Goes Digital – Automation & Production Technology for Adaptable Aircraft Production

Live event – July 1, 2020 - 11:00 to 11:45 (CET)
"Automation in Aerospace Industry @ Fraunhofer IFAM"

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM l Stade is presenting its forward-looking R&D portfolio for the first time at...

Im Focus: AI monitoring of laser welding processes - X-ray vision and eavesdropping ensure quality

With an X-ray experiment at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble (France), Empa researchers were able to demonstrate how well their real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams works. With almost 90 percent reliability, they detected the formation of unwanted pores that impair the quality of weld seams. Thanks to a special evaluation method based on artificial intelligence (AI), the detection process is completed in just 70 milliseconds.

Laser welding is a process suitable for joining metals and thermoplastics. It has become particularly well established in highly automated production, for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species

03.07.2020 | Life Sciences

Risk of infection with COVID-19 from singing: First results of aerosol study with the Bavarian Radio Chorus

03.07.2020 | Studies and Analyses

Efficient, Economical and Aesthetic: Researchers Build Electrodes from Leaves

03.07.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>