Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Signals from the blood of the mother enhance the maturation of the brain

16.09.2008
Neuroscientists characterize the signalling chain

The maturation of the brain of unborn infants is given a gentle “prod” by its mother. A protein messenger from the mother’s blood is transferred to the embryo and stimulates the growth and wiring of the neurons in the brain.

Neuroscientists in Bochum (Prof. Petra Wahle, Developmental Neurobiology at the Ruhr University), Magdeburg (Dr. Peter Landgraf, Prof. Michael R. Kreutz) and in Münster (Prof. Hans-Christian Pape) performed a detailed investigation of this signal transduction pathway and identified those molecules in the brain of the embryo that interact with the maternal messenger. This achievement delivers an important step towards the comprehension of this signal transduction pathway. Their research work is published in the current volume of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The maternal immune system produces a signal molecule

In previous studies, the scientists had already managed to isolate the polypeptide messenger that plays a decisive role in the brain development of embryos and newborn infants, namely the “survival promoting peptide / Y P30.” Y-P30 enhances the survival of thalamic (diencephalic) neurons and promotes the neuritogenic activity of cerebellar and thalamic neurons. Prof. Wahle explained that it is “interesting to note that Y-P30 is not synthesized directly within the developing infant brain, but is produced by specific immune cells of the mother’s blood during pregnancy.

From there it passes the blood-placenta barrier and accumulates - inter alia - in neurons of the cerebral cortex of the embryo.” (Landgraf P, Sieg F, Wahle P, Meyer G, Kreutz MR, Pape HC (2005) “A maternal blood-borne factor promotes survival of the developing thalamus”. FASEB Journal 19:225-227.”) The scientists were able to provide evidence of the peptide in the brain of fetuses of mice and humans, and of postnatal rats.

Messengers need receptors to be effective

It was of particular interest to identify possible receptors for Y-P30 to enable investigation of the biological role of the messenger and to clarify its mechanisms of action. The research team has succeeded in identifying the molecules that interact with Y-P30, namely pleiotrophin, a protein within the extracellular space, and so-called syndecans, i.e. proteins on the cell surface. It was known that both binding partners could promote the growth of neurons. The scientists were now able to show the Y-P30 enhances the development of the pleiotrophin/syndecan signaling complex and stabilizes it.

The signaling activity within the neurons is increased and enhances the neuritogenic activity. Prof. Petra Wahle and Suvarna Wagh, PhD student in research training group 736, were able to demonstrate a direct action of the Y-P30 peptide on the growth of axons (neurites). The signal-receptor-complex comprised of Y-P30, pleiotrophin und syndecan thus appears to enhance the development of the axonal projection tracts and the wiring of the brain.

Prof. Dr. Petra Wahle | alfa
Further information:
http://www.rub.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs
18.04.2019 | University of Hawaii at Manoa

nachricht New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection
18.04.2019 | Polytechnique Montréal

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

Im Focus: Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties

Engineers create novel optical devices, including a moth eye-inspired omnidirectional microwave antenna

A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>