Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sharp decrease in deaths from sudden cardiac arrest

23.11.2011
Only a few decades ago, sudden cardiac arrest was a death sentence. Today, a victim of sudden cardiac arrest is saved roughly once every six hours in Sweden, reveals a thesis from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, reviewing all cases of sudden cardiac arrest over a 30-year period.
Recent decades have brought enormous advances in the treatment of victims of sudden cardiac arrest, shows a thesis from the University of Gothenburg’s Sahlgrenska Academy which looks at 3,871 cases in Gothenburg both inside and outside hospital between 1980 and 2009.

Unique study
The thesis, in which doctoral student and registered physician Martin Fredriksson investigates both how patients were dealt with and with what outcome, includes several different studies, including three articles providing the first systematic and in-depth analysis of cardiac arrest inside hospital in Sweden. The uniqueness in the thesis is a comparative study of the same population, comparing both in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the same background population, which is unique and has never been done before.

Sharp decrease in deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Photo: University of Gothenburg

Defibrillators save many

A total of 1,115 people suffered cardiac arrest at Sahlgrenska University Hospital between 1994 and 2002, of whom 37% survived, and 86% of those were still alive a year later. For patients who could be treated with a defibrillator, the chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest were three times higher inside hospital than outside hospital.

Longer time to treatment outside hospital

For those who could not be treated with a defibrillator, survival was seven times higher among those in hospital. The difference is partly because it takes much longer to start defibrillation outside hospital.

“Other factors also play a role, though,” says Dr Fredriksson. “For example, most patients in hospital have a type of cardiac arrest that can be treated with a defibrillator, and the quality of CPR is better in hospital where victims can quickly be given highly advanced care.”

More victims outside hospital now survive

The number of people surviving cardiac arrest outside hospital has nevertheless increased over the past decade.

“This is probably due to several factors, including the introduction of mechanical chest compression, but CPR by bystanders is also becoming more common, and follow-up care in hospital has improved.”

9% fully survive
Of the 3,871 cases of sudden cardiac arrest reviewed, 8.8% of victims survived and could be discharged from hospital. In the subgroup of patients suffering from ventricular fibrillation, which is the kind of cardiac arrest that can be treated with a defibrillator, one in five patients could be discharged.
SUDDEN CARDIAC ARREST
Sudden cardiac arrest is where the heart stops pumping, causing the victim to lose consciousness and show no signs of life. In many cases, a heart attack causes the heart to lose its normal rhythm, known as ventricular fibrillation. For the victim to survive, the heart’s rhythm needs to be restored within minutes. The risk of death increases by the minute until treatment commences, so a rapid response in the form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation is vital.
For more information, please contact: Martin Fredriksson
Mobile: +46 (0)708 110699
E-mail: Martin.Fredriksson@vgregion.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Gold nanoclusters: new frontier for developing medication for treatment of Alzheimer's disease
17.02.2020 | Science China Press

nachricht Catalyst deposition on fragile chips
17.02.2020 | Ruhr-University Bochum

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

Im Focus: Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Investigation of the temperature dependence of the skyrmion Hall effect reveals further insights into possible new data storage devices

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated...

Im Focus: Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient. Among their proposals are smart, error-correcting data chip circuits, which they refined to be 10 times less energy consumptive. The project has yielded several scientific articles, in publications including Nature Communications.

Streaming films and music, scrolling through social media, and using cloud-based storage services are everyday activities now.

Im Focus: New synthesis methods enhance 3D chemical space for drug discovery

After helping develop a new approach for organic synthesis -- carbon-hydrogen functionalization -- scientists at Emory University are now showing how this approach may apply to drug discovery. Nature Catalysis published their most recent work -- a streamlined process for making a three-dimensional scaffold of keen interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

"Our tools open up whole new chemical space for potential drug targets," says Huw Davies, Emory professor of organic chemistry and senior author of the paper.

Im Focus: Quantum fluctuations sustain the record superconductor

Superconductivity approaching room temperature may be possible in hydrogen-rich compounds at much lower pressures than previously expected

Reaching room-temperature superconductivity is one of the biggest dreams in physics. Its discovery would bring a technological revolution by providing...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gold nanoclusters: new frontier for developing medication for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

17.02.2020 | Life Sciences

Artificial intelligence is becoming sustainable!

17.02.2020 | Information Technology

Catalyst deposition on fragile chips

17.02.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>