Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Screens set to go green

22.08.2011
Electronic screens based on new energy-efficient technology could become more affordable thanks to the substitution of expensive metal components with copper ones

Fitting the screens of electronic devices, such as televisions and smartphones, with a new display technology called ‘organic light-emitting diodes’ (OLEDs) will reduce their energy consumption, but such screens currently require rare and expensive metal components. Now, Masahisa Osawa and his colleagues at the RIKEN Innovation Center in Wako, along with researchers from electronics company Canon, have found a way to replace these costly metals with copper.


The molecular structure of the bulky organic ligand that turns copper (green) into an efficient light emitter (yellow, phosphorus; red, bromine). Copyright : © 2011 Masahisa Osawa

In addition to offering significant energy savings over conventional LCD-based displays, OLED screens improve picture quality by producing richer blacks; they also offer a wider viewing angle. In an LCD screen, each pixel is effectively a little filter, selectively blocking light produced by a large backlight. In an OLED screen, however, each pixel is a tiny light emitter such that no backlight is needed. This means that pixels in dark areas of the image consume no power, reducing energy use.

To maximize the energy-saving benefit, screen makers select OLED materials that most efficiently convert electrical current into light, a property known as high external quantum efficiency (EQE). Some of the best materials are phosphorescent metal complexes, but these are typically composed of rare and expensive metals such as iridium.

Copper complexes have long been known as potential alternatives, and would cost 1/2,000th that of iridium phosphors, according to Osawa. Until the work of Osawa and his colleagues, however, these copper complexes had a low EQE. Such complexes can be readily excited into a high-energy state, but they tend to physically distort, which dissipates their extra energy rather than emitting it as light.

The researchers resolved this problem by altering the molecular environment in which the copper sits. They wrapped each copper ion inside a newly designed bulky organic ligand. They then conducted X-ray diffraction studies, which revealed that the ligand had forced the copper to become three-coordinate—it had formed three bonds to the ligand, rather than the usual four (Fig. 1).

Osawa and colleagues also demonstrated that the EQE of their green-light-emitting copper complex increased dramatically and matched that of iridium complexes. “The three-coordinate structure is a crucial factor for high EQE, because it hardly distorts in the excited state,” Osawa explains.

The team’s next step will be to deploy the complex in a working device. Copper might not be limited to producing green light, Osawa adds. “Our goal is to make red-, green-, and blue-colored phosphorescent three-coordinate copper materials.”

The corresponding author for this highlight is based at the Luminescent Materials Laboratory, RIKEN Research Cluster for Innovation

Reference:
Hashimoto, M., Igawa, S., Yashima, M., Kawata, I., Hoshino, M. & Osawa, M. Highly efficient green organic light-emitting diodes containing luminescent three-coordinate copper(I) complexes. Journal of the American Chemical Society 133, 10348–10351 (2011).

gro-pr | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.rikenresearch.riken.jp/eng/research/6675
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Insect Antibiotic Provides New Way to Eliminate Bacteria
15.11.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New findings help to better calculate the oceans’ contribution to climate regulation
15.11.2018 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New findings help to better calculate the oceans’ contribution to climate regulation

15.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Automated adhesive film placement and stringer integration for aircraft manufacture

15.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

14.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>