Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers uncover novel amyloidosis

25.10.2019

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered a novel amyloid protein that induces amyloidosis in rats. This new amyloid protein is known to be the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and accumulated very frequently in the mammary gland of aged rats. Although LBP was identified as an amyloid protein by this research using rats, learning from rats is very important for understanding the cause of human diseases because a human also has LBP. Hence, their findings of this research are useful for predicting the future occurrence of human amyloidosis and as a disease model animal.

The researchers published their results on Oct 15th in Amyloid.

Amyloidosis is a disease group showing the deposition of amyloid that is misfolded protein originating from the host protein, i.e., this case LBP. For amyloidosis, unfortunately, no cure is available, but treatments can help symptoms and produce less amyloid protein.


A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered a novel amyloid protein that induces amyloidosis in rats. This new amyloid protein is known to be the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and accumulated very frequently in the mammary gland of aged rats. The results of this research are useful for predicting the future occurrence of human amyloidosis and as a disease model animal.

Credit: Tomoaki Murakami, TUAT

"When looking into mammary glands of old rats, interestingly we very often saw needle-shaped amyloid", said Tomoaki Murakami, DVM, PhD, the first and corresponding author on the paper and Associate Professor in Laboratory of Veterinary Toxicology, Cooperative Department of Veterinary Medicine at TUAT.

Amyloid deposition was actually observed in 83% of aged female rats. "We are very surprised at this finding, because it was known that in rats amyloidosis is extremely rare and that spontaneous rat amyloidosis had not been reported for about half a century."

In contrast to old rats, in younger rats, amyloid deposition was not at all observed. The difference between the aged and youth was the presence or absence of an intra-mammary gland structure called "Corpora amylacea", which are round, glass-like substances, meaning "starch-like bodies" in Latin. "We found that the needle-shaped amyloid was always formed on the surface of Corpora amylacea", said Murakami.

"After we carried out histological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and proteomic analysis, LBP was identified as a prime candidate for amyloid protein," according to Murakami. LBP is known to be involved in innate immunity and is expressed in various animal species including humans.

"We would like to point out that we discovered novel amyloidosis in rats and that Corpora amylacea formation during aging is its risk factors. In human, iatrogenic amyloidosis and transmissible amyloidosis have been reported as non-spontaneous amyloidosis. We expect that this study provides useful information for predicting the accidentally induced amyloidosis in human that may occur in the future", Murakami added.

###

For information about the Murakami laboratory, please visit http://web.tuat.ac.jp/~tatlvt/indexeng.html

This research was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 16H05027 and 17K17702) and TUAT President's Discretionary Funding to support the launch of next-generation research project.

About Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT):

TUAT is a distinguished university in Japan dedicated to science and technology. TUAT focuses on agriculture and engineering that form the foundation of industry, and promotes education and research fields that incorporate them. Boasting a history of over 140 years since our founding in 1874, TUAT continues to boldly take on new challenges and steadily promote fields. With high ethics, TUAT fulfills social responsibility in the capacity of transmitting science and technology information towards the construction of a sustainable society where both human beings and nature can thrive in a symbiotic relationship. For more information, please visit http://www.tuat.ac.jp/en/.

Original Publication:

Needle-shaped amyloid deposition in rat mammary gland: evidence of a novel amyloid fibril protein. Tomoaki Murakami*, Keiichi Noguchi, Naomi Hachiya, Fuyuki Kametani, Masayoshi Tasaki, Satoshi Nakaba, Yukiko Sassa, Taro Yamashita, Konen Obayashi, Yukio Ando, Masao Hamamura, Takeshi Kanno, and Kazufumi Kawasako.

Amyloid, 2019, Oct 15:1-11

https://doi.org/10.1080/13506129.2019.1675623

Contact:

Tomoaki Murakami, DVM, PhD.
Associate Professor,
Laboratory of Veterinary Toxicology, Cooperative Department of Veterinary Medicine, TUAT, Japan
E-mail: mrkmt@cc.tuat.ac.jp

Media Contact

Yutaka Nibu, Ph.D.
yutakanibu@go.tuat.ac.jp
81-423-887-550

http://www.tuat.ac.jp/en/ 

Yutaka Nibu, Ph.D. | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13506129.2019.1675623

Further reports about: Amyloid Toxicology amyloid protein amyloidosis gland

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists discover how the molecule-sorting station in our cells is formed and maintained
18.11.2019 | Tokyo University of Science

nachricht Pesticides: Improved effect prediction of low toxicant concentrations
18.11.2019 | Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Images from NJIT's big bear solar observatory peel away layers of a stellar mystery

An international team of scientists, including three researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), has shed new light on one of the central mysteries of solar physics: how energy from the Sun is transferred to the star's upper atmosphere, heating it to 1 million degrees Fahrenheit and higher in some regions, temperatures that are vastly hotter than the Sun's surface.

With new images from NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), the researchers have revealed in groundbreaking, granular detail what appears to be a likely...

Im Focus: New opportunities in additive manufacturing presented

Fraunhofer IFAM Dresden demonstrates manufacturing of copper components

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Dresden has succeeded in using Selective Electron Beam Melting (SEBM) to...

Im Focus: New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are valuable for a wide variety of applications. Made of graphene sheets rolled into tubes 10,000 times smaller than a human hair, CNTs have an exceptional strength-to-mass ratio and excellent thermal and electrical properties. These features make them ideal for a range of applications, including supercapacitors, interconnects, adhesives, particle trapping and structural color.

New research reveals even more potential for CNTs: as a coating, they can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing,...

Im Focus: Magnets for the second dimension

If you've ever tried to put several really strong, small cube magnets right next to each other on a magnetic board, you'll know that you just can't do it. What happens is that the magnets always arrange themselves in a column sticking out vertically from the magnetic board. Moreover, it's almost impossible to join several rows of these magnets together to form a flat surface. That's because magnets are dipolar. Equal poles repel each other, with the north pole of one magnet always attaching itself to the south pole of another and vice versa. This explains why they form a column with all the magnets aligned the same way.

Now, scientists at ETH Zurich have managed to create magnetic building blocks in the shape of cubes that - for the first time ever - can be joined together to...

Im Focus: A new quantum data classification protocol brings us nearer to a future 'quantum internet'

The algorithm represents a first step in the automated learning of quantum information networks

Quantum-based communication and computation technologies promise unprecedented applications, such as unconditionally secure communications, ultra-precise...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

05.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Volcanoes under pressure

18.11.2019 | Earth Sciences

Scientists discover how the molecule-sorting station in our cells is formed and maintained

18.11.2019 | Life Sciences

Hot electrons harvested without tricks

18.11.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>