Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers track down new biocatalysts

05.02.2019

Phosphate is a key element in many processes in the body and essential for global food production. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now developed a method to detect new enzymes from the environment that can release phosphate. This opens up new possibilities for the development and optimisation of phytase-based processes for industrial application, biotechnology and environmentally friendly technologies. The results were published in the scientific journal mBio.

Enzymes such as phytases and phosphatases are required to be able to use organically bound phosphate. The research group led by Professor Rolf Daniel from the Institute of Microbiology and Genetics at the University of Göttingen develops standardised methods to isolate novel phosphatases and phytases from complex environmental samples.


Scientist examines bacterial growth after phytase screening.

Photo: G.A. Castillo Villamizar

"The phytases currently used commercially originate from the cultivation of individual strains of microorganisms," says Daniel. “This is a waste of potential for the development of new, more effective processes through the use of improved enzymes.”

Phosphates are used as fertilisers in large quantities in conventional agriculture. The increasing depletion of natural phosphorus resources and the pollution of phosphorus deposits with heavy metals make new strategies for the extraction and recycling of phosphates more urgent.

The new method is based on the screening of specially constructed gene libraries from the entire gene pool of organisms in different habitats. The researchers take samples from sediments and soil and clone the total DNA. They then observe which activities develop in these gene libraries.

An innovative screening method is used in which phytate serves as a phosphate source. This enabled the researchers to identify the largest variety of phosphatases and phytases ever obtained using functional metagenomics, including new phytase subtypes with hitherto completely unknown functional groups and new properties.

Phosphatases and phytases are natural biocatalysts that play a central role in many metabolic processes and contribute to the release of organically bound phosphate. Phytases are specialised in the degradation of phytates found in cereals and many other plants.

They are already used in the animal feed industry as a feed additive to prevent the phosphate naturally contained in plant food from passing unused through the intestines when feeding non-ruminants such as pigs or poultry. Phytases in particular are therefore considered to have great market potential.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Professor Rolf Daniel
University of Göttingen
Department of Genomic and Applied Microbiology
Grisebachstraße8
37077 Göttingen, Germany
Phone: +49 551 39-33827
E-ail: rdaniel@gwdg.de
Internet: http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en//318960.html

Originalpublikation:

Genis Andrés Castillo Villamizar et al. Functional Metagenomics Reveals an Overlooked Diversity and Novel Features of Soil-Derived Bacterial Phosphatases and Phytases. mBio 2019. https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01966-18

Thomas Richter | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Malignant bone marrow disease: New hope for MPN patients
05.02.2019 | Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien

nachricht Microbes hitched to insects provide a rich source of new antibiotics
04.02.2019 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Invisible tags: Physicists at TU Dresden write, read and erase using light

A team of physicists headed by Prof. Sebastian Reineke of TU Dresden developed a new method of storing information in fully transparent plastic foils. Their innovative idea was now published in the renowned online journal “Science Advances”.

Prof. Reineke and his LEXOS team work with simple plastic foils with a thickness of less than 50 µm, which is thinner than a human hair. In these transparent...

Im Focus: IT in cars: Computers on standby

In the future, cars will exchange data via radio and warn each other about obstacles and accidents. There are currently various radio standards in existence to allow this. However, it is almost impossible to compare them, because the requisite hardware is not yet on the market. To address this lack, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich Hertz Institute, HHI have developed a software system that will enable users to analyze the future wireless technology. For manufacturers, this is an ideal solution for testing interesting radio applications at an early stage.

Slowly but surely, the automobile is developing into the autonomous vehicle, as new functions are added with each new generation. Proximity radars are by now...

Im Focus: Making ultrafast lasers faster

Lasers with ultrashort pulses in the picosecond and femtosecond range are often referred to as ultrafast lasers. They are known for their ultra-precise ablation and cutting results. Unfortunately, processing with such lasers takes time. To address this issue, a new research project, funded by the European Commission, aims to make material processing with ultrafast lasers up to a hundred times faster.

Ultrashort pulsed (USP) or ultrafast lasers can do something very unique: They ablate almost any material without causing a thermal load of the adjacent...

Im Focus: New analysis methods facilitate the evaluation of complex engineering data

A further increase in the performance of supercomputers is expected over the next few years. So-called exascale computers will be able to deliver more precise simulations. This leads to considerably more data. Fraunhofer SCAI develops efficient data analysis methods for this purpose, which provide the engineer with detailed insights into the complex technical contexts.

Simulations on supercomputers answer important industrial questions, such as how air flows behave in air conditioning systems, on rotor blades or for entire...

Im Focus: Researchers wild about zigzags

Breakthrough in graphene research: large, stable pieces of graphene produced with unique edge pattern

Graphene is a promising material for use in nanoelectronics. Its electronic properties depend greatly, however, on how the edges of the carbon layer are formed.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

11th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Aachen, 3-4 April 2019

14.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Current generation via quantum proton transfer

05.02.2019 | Information Technology

Supercomputing helps study two-dimensional materials

04.02.2019 | Information Technology

Sodium is the new lithium: Researchers find a way to boost sodium-ion battery performance

04.02.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>