Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers make neural networks successfully detect DNA damage caused by UV radiation

25.10.2019

Researchers of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology (Prague) conducted a series of experiments, which proved that artificial neural networks can accurately identify DNA damages caused by UV radiation.

According to the authors, the ways the UV could affect the DNA structure, especially with the short-term irradiation, remain practically unstudied. The UV radiation is also known to cause cancer. However, it is almost impossible to detect minor changes in the DNA structure.


This is a schematic diagram of the SERS sensor operation in combination with the neural network for the analysis of DNA damage.

Credit: Tomsk Polytechnic University

"In the article Label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with artificial neural network technique for recognition photoinduced DNA damage, we offer an alternative to well-known techniques. We used model samples such as oligonucleotides of various sequences. Some of them were irradiated with UV for different periods of time. Then, we used highly sensitive sensor systems developed by the research team based on plasmon-polariton gold gratings. The oligonucleotides were immobilized on the sensor surface. They subsequently were hybridized with the irradiated oligonucleotides. Then, the changes in the DNA structure were analyzed using a Raman spectrometer, " Pavel Postnikov, Associate Prof. of the TPU Research School of Chemistry & Applied Biomedical Sciences, says.

He also noticed that the obtained spectra were used to train artificial neural networks. The analysis and interpretation of the oligonucleotide sequence spectra is quite a complex task, especially if it is large-scale and performed with a high level of statistics processing.

"Using neural networks enabled to avoid the numerical processing of a huge number of spectra and it freed us from the optimization of measurement procedure. Besides, the neural networks both reveal the damages and effectively predict changes in the DNA structure caused by UV radiation.

Moreover, the neural network in combination with the surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy can detect changes with high accuracy, where traditional methods fail", - Pavel Postnikov says.

The researchers believe that the neural networks and Raman spectroscopy can be successfully used for medical diagnostics in the future. Moreover, this technique can be further improved.

"Analysis of biological objects by Raman spectroscopy methods is still an extremely difficult, but interesting and promising issue. In this regard, DNA damages caused by the UV radiation was an extremely interesting model for us.

This concept provides the detecting of minor changes in the DNA structure. It can be expanded and improved, " - Pavel Postnikov underlines. He also specifies, that the studies are supported by a grant under the TPU Competitiveness Improvement Program and conducted under the scientific supervision of Prof. Marina Trusova, the Research School of Chemistry & Applied Biomedical Sciences.

The Research School of Chemistry & Applied Biomedical Sciences implements more than ten various projects on the development of hybrid materials, combining different properties. One of these areas is the development of highly sensitive sensor systems.

Sensors are a multilayer construction: they are based on a thin, wavy gold film 1x0.5 cm in size, which is modified with diazonium salts, special organic compounds.

Due to the developments of the TPU research team, the sensor can detect toxic substances, heavy metals, and some diseases and defects in the DNA structure. The advantages of hybrid sensors are hypersensitivity, the speed of analysis and the ability to analyze at the sampling site.

Media Contact

Vitalii Sdelnikov
Sdelnikov@tpu.ru
892-343-60344

 @TPUnews_en

http://www.tpu.ru/en 

Vitalii Sdelnikov | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://news.tpu.ru/en/news/2019/10/23/35408/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2019.111718

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A new 'cool' blue
17.01.2020 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Neuromuscular organoid: It’s contracting!
17.01.2020 | Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Miniature double glazing: Material developed which is heat-insulating and heat-conducting at the same time

Styrofoam or copper - both materials have very different properties with regard to their ability to conduct heat. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz and the University of Bayreuth have now jointly developed and characterized a novel, extremely thin and transparent material that has different thermal conduction properties depending on the direction. While it can conduct heat extremely well in one direction, it shows good thermal insulation in the other direction.

Thermal insulation and thermal conduction play a crucial role in our everyday lives - from computer processors, where it is important to dissipate heat as...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer IAF establishes an application laboratory for quantum sensors

In order to advance the transfer of research developments from the field of quantum sensor technology into industrial applications, an application laboratory is being established at Fraunhofer IAF. This will enable interested companies and especially regional SMEs and start-ups to evaluate the innovation potential of quantum sensors for their specific requirements. Both the state of Baden-Württemberg and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft are supporting the four-year project with one million euros each.

The application laboratory is being set up as part of the Fraunhofer lighthouse project »QMag«, short for quantum magnetometry. In this project, researchers...

Im Focus: How Cells Assemble Their Skeleton

Researchers study the formation of microtubules

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A...

Im Focus: World Premiere in Zurich: Machine keeps human livers alive for one week outside of the body

Researchers from the University Hospital Zurich, ETH Zurich, Wyss Zurich and the University of Zurich have developed a machine that repairs injured human livers and keep them alive outside the body for one week. This breakthrough may increase the number of available organs for transplantation saving many lives of patients with severe liver diseases or cancer.

Until now, livers could be stored safely outside the body for only a few hours. With the novel perfusion technology, livers - and even injured livers - can now...

Im Focus: SuperTIGER on its second prowl -- 130,000 feet above Antarctica

A balloon-borne scientific instrument designed to study the origin of cosmic rays is taking its second turn high above the continent of Antarctica three and a half weeks after its launch.

SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is designed to measure the rare, heavy elements in cosmic rays that hold clues about their origins...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

„Advanced Battery Power“- Conference, Contributions are welcome!

07.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

A new 'cool' blue

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences

EU-project SONAR: Better batteries for electricity from renewable energy sources

17.01.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Neuromuscular organoid: It’s contracting!

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>