Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Design of New Biomaterials from lactic acid

30.11.2007
Researchers from the Universidad Rey Juan Carlos have developed new biocompatible polymeric materials that have many applications inside the medical surgery and the biodegradable materials fields.

Polymeric biomaterials derived from lactic acid have extensive uses in medical applications, especially in the context of biodegradable sutures. They are widely used in the architecture of cardiac tissue, as support for drugs, and biodegradable fixation devices for the repair of small broken bones such as the ones in the hands, joints and feet.

These orthopaedic implants are gradually metabolised and naturally assimilated by the body. Their mass is progressively transferred into the broken bone, helping the healing process and thereby eliminating the need for a second intervention.

These new materials are obtained through molecular catalysis, and require breaking the cyclic dimer of lactic acid “lactide” to obtain polylactic acid (PLA). The lactide is a renewable natural resource that occurs as a by-product of the fermentation of biomass with high starch content, such as maize, wheat, or sugar beet. As in every polymerisation process, a catalyst is required and in this case the active compound must be a metal.

... more about:
»Metal »PLA »acid »biodegradable »catalyst »lactic

Consequently, this catalytic process has been studied with different metals such as tin, yttrium, titanium, aluminium and other lanthanides. However, since on some occasions residues of the catalyst can be incorporated into the polymer, it is important to preserve the biocompatibility and zero toxicity of the PLA by insuring that the metallic catalyst used is biologically benign and does not have a negative impact on tissue. These medical uses have favoured the use of metals like magnesium, calcium or zinc, all of them common inside the human body.

On a different front, PLAs are being investigated as a possible raw material of many manufactured products, since they present similar and in some cases better properties than traditional polymers that are derived from the bioresistant poly (a-olefin), with the significant added benefit of biodegradation.

While their production costs were considered too high in the past, recent developments in the treatment and production combined with the contrasting ecological hazard represented by petroleum derived polymers have brought these types of biodegradable polymers to very competitive positions.

One of the most recent and relevant examples that confirm this growing expansion, is the joint endeavour by Cargill. Inc., and The Dow Chemical Co., who have recently announced the mass production of many tons of PLAs.

The scientific community shows a growing interest to find catalysts that are capable of producing such biomaterials with well defined microstructures, since this defines the mechanical properties, the biodegradability, and the overall usability of the material.

With this in mind, the research group from the URJC, formed by Dr Andrés Garcés and Carlos Alonso and coordinated by Dr Luis Fernando Sánchez-Barba, is working in collaboration with the UCLM to develop different families of catalysts based on magnesium and zinc and stabilised by ligands like heteroscorpionate of they type “NNN”, capable of polymerising the ε-caprolactone and the lactide in a controlled manner. These are extremely active initiators with a chemical formula of [M(R)(NNN)] (M = Mg, Zn) that achieve a productivity of 21.000 Kg of poly-ε- caprolactone (PLC) produced per mol of Mg each hour at room temperature.

Moreover, some of these initiators allow for a controlled growth of the PLA’s microstructure. This is linked to the influence that the heteroscorpionate exerts during the process of opening the cyclic dimmer, which in turn grants control over the future specifications and applications of the produced material such as a high molecular mass, crystallinity as well as high fusion temperature (165ºC), all of it generating a great interest from industry.

This study has been published in the latest editions of the Inorganic Chemistry & Organometallics magazine.

Gabinete de prensa | alfa
Further information:
http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi/orgnd7/2007/26/
http://pubs.acs.org/cgi-bin/abstract.cgi/inocaj/2007/46/i05/abs/ic062093c.html

Further reports about: Metal PLA acid biodegradable catalyst lactic

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Joining forces for immune research
13.08.2018 | Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

nachricht The “TRiC” to folding actin
10.08.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

Im Focus: World record: Fastest 3-D tomographic images at BESSY II

The quality of materials often depends on the manufacturing process. In casting and welding, for example, the rate at which melts solidify and the resulting microstructure of the alloy is important. With metallic foams as well, it depends on exactly how the foaming process takes place. To understand these processes fully requires fast sensing capability. The fastest 3D tomographic images to date have now been achieved at the BESSY II X-ray source operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.

Dr. Francisco Garcia-Moreno and his team have designed a turntable that rotates ultra-stably about its axis at a constant rotational speed. This really depends...

Im Focus: A molecular switch may serve as new target point for cancer and diabetes therapies

If certain signaling cascades are misregulated, diseases like cancer, obesity and diabetes may occur. A mechanism recently discovered by scientists at the Leibniz- Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) in Berlin and at the University of Geneva has a crucial influence on such signaling cascades and may be an important key for the future development of therapies against these diseases. The results of the study have just been published in the prestigious scientific journal 'Molecular Cell'.

Cell growth and cell differentiation as well as the release and efficacy of hormones such as insulin depend on the presence of lipids. Lipids are small...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

NRL's sun imaging telescopes fly on NASA Parker Solar Probe

13.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

UT-ORNL team makes first particle accelerator beam measurement in six dimensions

13.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

ASU astrophysicist helps discover that ultrahot planets have starlike atmospheres

13.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>