Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Insulin Signaling and Amphetamines, Insomniac Fish and more...

16.10.2007
Insulin signaling and amphetamines

Abuse of psychostimulants such as amphetamine remains a serious public health concern. Amphetamines mediate their behavioral effects by stimulating dopaminergic signaling throughout reward circuits of the brain. This property of amphetamine relies on its actions at the dopamine transporter (DAT), a presynaptic plasma membrane protein responsible for the reuptake of extracellular dopamine. Recently, researchers have revealed the novel ability of insulin signaling pathways in the brain to regulate DAT function as well as the cellular and behavioral actions of amphetamine. In a new study published in the open-access journal PLoS Biology, Aurelio Galli, Jason Williams and colleagues used a model of Type I diabetes in rats to uncover how insulin signaling regulates DAT-mediated amphetamine effects. They show that by depleting insulin, or through selective inhibition of insulin signaling, they can severely attenuate amphetamine-induced dopamine release and impair DAT function. This study verifies in vivo that insulin signaling can dynamically influence the neuronal effects of amphetamine-like psychostimulants. Therefore, the insulin signaling pathway, through its unique regulation of brain dopamine, may be targeted for the treatment of amphetamine abuse.

Citation: Williams JM, Owens WA, Turner GH, Saunders C, Dipace C, et al. (2007) Hypoinsulinemia regulates amphetamine-induced reverse transport of dopamine. PLoS Biol 5(10): e274. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050274

Insomniac Fish Shed Light on the Molecular Basis of Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are common and poorly understood. In humans, narcolepsy is a sleep disorder associated with sleepiness, abnormal dreaming, paralysis and insomnia. Neuropeptides called hypocretins are implicated in this disorder. A new study by Yokogawa and colleagues at Stanford University now reveals that fish, like mammals, sleep, and their hypocretin receptor plays an important role. Their work is published online this week in the open-access journal PLoS Biology.

The authors first generated a mutant fish in which the hypocretin system was disrupted. Intriguingly, this first fish sleep mutant did not display sleepiness or paralysis but showed a 30% reduction of its sleep time at night and a 60% decrease in sleep bout length compared with non-mutant fish. They also studied the relationships between the hypocretin system and other sleep regulatory brain systems in zebrafish and found differences in expression patterns in the brain that may explain the differences in behavioral effects. Their study illustrates how a sleep regulatory system may have evolved across vertebrate phylogeny. Zebrafish, a powerful genetic model that has the advantage of transparency to study neuronal networks in vivo, can be used to study sleep.

Citation: Yokogawa T, Marin W, Faraco J, Pe´zeron G, Appelbaum L, et al. (2007) Characterization of sleep in zebrafish and insomnia in hypocretin receptor mutants. PLoS Biol 5(10): e277. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050277

Drug-Induced Epigenetic Changes Produce Drug Tolerance

In a study published this week in PLoS Biology, Dr. Nigel Atkinson, Dr. Yan Wang, and colleagues discovered that a startlingly large number of adolescents abuse organic solvent inhalants, common components of glues, paints and cleaning solutions. Their focus is on the molecular basis of tolerance—reduced response to a drug over time—which promotes increased drug consumption and accelerates the process of addiction. They use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to determine how the nervous system becomes tolerant to the sedative effects of organic solvents. Sedating Drosophila with an organic solvent (benzyl alcohol) increases the expression of the slo K+ channel gene, which accelerates recovery from sedation. To elucidate the molecular mechanics underlying these phenomena, they documented dynamic changes in a chemical modification (called histone acetylation) that occurs within the slo regulatory region after sedation. These changes were mediated by a transcription factor and are linked to both slo induction and behavioral tolerance. Increased expression of slo channels are predicted to alter the signaling properties of neurons. This modification directly speeds the recovery from sedation.

Citation: Wang Y, Krishnan HR, Ghezzi A, Yin JCP, Atkinson NS (2007) Drug-induced epigenetic changes produce drug tolerance. PLoS Biol 5(10): e265. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050265

Assessing Tumor Progression Factors by Somatic Gene Transfer into a Mouse Model: Bcl-xL Promotes Islet Tumor Cell Invasion

Cancer cells accumulate multiple genetic alterations. Some of these contribute to tumor development while others are a mere byproduct of genomic instability. To sort out whether a candidate gene can promote tumor development, Dr. Yi-Chieh Nancy Du, Dr. Harold Varmus, and colleagues have developed a novel experimental system using engineered viruses to deliver genes into premalignant lesions. They have used genetically engineered mice in which both an oncogene (SV40 T antigen) and a specific docking molecule for the virus are produced in ß ells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Tumors form in only a subset of the islets expressing this oncogene, indicating that tumor development requires other events. Since these precancerous cells also express the virus docking molecule, they could deliver candidate progression genes via the virus to see whether they contribute to tumor progression. They show that genes encoding two proteins (a survival factor, Bcl-xL, and an inhibitory form of the cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin) can be delivered into premalignant ß-cells and enhance tumorigenesis. Both of these proteins were previously implicated in tumor progression, confirming that their technique can identify such progression genes. Moreover, we find that Bcl-xL promotes tumor cell migration and invasion by a mechanism distinct from its known role in cell survival.

Citation: Du YN, Lewis BC, Hanahan D, Varmus H (2007) Assessing tumor progression factors by somatic gene transfer into a mouse model: Bcl-xL promotes islet tumor cell

invasion. PLoS Biol 5(10): e276. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050276

A Novel Snf2 Protein Maintains trans-Generational Regulatory States Established by Paramutation in Maize

Genetics is founded on the principle that heritable changes in genes are caused by mutations and that the regulatory state of gene pairs (alleles) is passed on to progeny unchanged. An exception to this rule, paramutation, produces changes in gene control that are stably inherited without altering the DNA sequence. Typically, one allele "paramutates," or silences, its counterpart by altering the structure of the chromatin surrounding the gene. Recent work in both maize and mice suggests that RNA molecules may be responsible for paramutations. Several genes are required to maintain the repressed paramutant state of a maize purple plant1 (pl1) allele, and in a recent study published in PLoS Biology by Dr. Jay B. Hollick, Dr. Christopher J. Hale, and colleagues report that one of these genes encodes a protein (RMR1) with similarity to a protein previously implicated in facilitating genomic DNA modifications via small RNA molecules. Genetic and molecular experiments support a similar role for RMR1 acting at a repeated sequence found adjacent to this pl1 gene. Although loss of these DNA modifications leads to heritable changes in gene regulation, the data indicates these changes do not represent the heritable feature responsible for paramutation. These findings highlight an unusual but dynamic role for repeated genomic features and small RNA molecules in affecting heritable genetic changes independent of the DNA template.

Citation: Hale CJ, Stonaker JL, Gross SM, Hollick JB (2007) A novel Snf2 protein maintains trans-generational regulatory states established by paramutation in maize. PLoS Biol 5(10): e275. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050275

Andrew Hyde | alfa
Further information:
http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0050274
http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0050277
http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get- document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.0050265

Further reports about: 1371/journal Amphetamine Bcl-xL Biol DNA DOI PLoS Signaling behavioral dopamine heritable hypocretin islet paramutation pbio slo

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy
17.12.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Communication between neural networks
17.12.2018 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

When a fish becomes fluid

17.12.2018 | Studies and Analyses

Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy

17.12.2018 | Life Sciences

How electric heating could save CO2 emissions

17.12.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>