Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Combining old with new could resolve fertility problems

21.03.2006


Many women with fertility problems could have a significantly better chance of having a baby if modern IVF techniques are combined with more traditional surgical interventions, according to a leading fertility specialist.



Mr TC Li, Honorary Professor at Sheffield Hallam University, says that surgical techniques should be used alongside IVF more often, especially for women who have repeatedly failed to conceive using IVF alone.

He explained in a lecture at Sheffield Hallam University that when IVF was first pioneered it was considered to be more effective than surgery and less invasive. However, as time has gone on surgical interventions have improved, but fertility treatment has yet to catch up with these developments.


Mr Li explains, “Surgery has improved significantly over recent years and in some cases can increase the chances of successful conception through IVF.

“For example, if a woman has blocked fallopian tubes fluid from the tubes can seep into the uterus, preventing the embryo from implanting. By surgically dealing with the blocked tubes the IVF has a much higher chance of success. Endometriosis is another common condition that can be helped with surgery.

“Basically, sometimes the woman’s body is not able to support an embryo, which is why IVF fails. Surgery can correct some of these problems and give her the best possible chance of conception. This type of surgery can also help some women who have suffered from repeated miscarriage.

“I had one patient, Zoe, who suffered from fibroids and a hormonal problem and had been trying unsuccessfully for a baby for years. She had suffered five miscarriages and was on the verge of paying £10,000 for pioneering treatment abroad. I looked into her case and by combining the two techniques she was able to conceive through IVF and now has a healthy one year old son.”

Zoe says, “I had five miscarriages and was told by doctors that I would never have a baby and should look into a hysterectomy when I was only in my twenties. I had already had two surgeons try unsuccessfully to remove fibroids and was admitted to hospital several times a year due to heavy bleeding.

“I heard about Mr Li when I did a presentation on hypnotherapy and complementary medicine at his hospital and he was the first doctor who thought I had a chance of conceiving. I never gave up hope and neither did he. It took more surgery and months of daily tests but I eventually fell pregnant with my son and this time I didn’t miscarry.

“I know that women with severe fibroids and other gynaecological problems can give up when they are told by a doctor that there is no chance of conceiving, but I hope that my story with encourage them to ask for a second opinion and not to give up hope.”

Mr Li says, “It is crucial that we ensure our trainee gynaecologists have the skills necessary to both recognise problems that could benefit from surgical intervention and to remedy them. Some young doctors now don’t see enough surgery during their training to be confident in these techniques.

“Both IVF and gynaecological surgery have been around for a long time. By combining the strengths of these two techniques doctors can help more of the one on seven couples with fertility problems to conceive.”

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional “protein knockdown” in vertebrates
20.08.2018 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves
17.08.2018 | Leibniz Universität Hannover

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum bugs, meet your new swatter

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional “protein knockdown” in vertebrates

20.08.2018 | Life Sciences

Metamolds: Molding a mold

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>