Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Babies born after single embryo transfer (SET) do as well as those conceived naturally

21.06.2005


Two studies presented today (Tuesday 21 June 2005) at the 21st annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology provide further proof that single embryo transfer (SET) produces babies that are healthier than those born after multiple implantations.



Dr. Diane De Neubourg, from the Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium, told the conference that babies born after SET are as healthy as singleton babies born after a spontaneous conception. She said that these findings, from the first well-documented follow- up of SET outcomes, further underlined the principle that SET was good clinical practice in IVF and ICSI.

Dr. De Neubourg and her team began by studying the outcomes of all SET pregnancies originating from IVF and ICSI at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine. In addition to analysing existing data, they sent questionnaires to all patients after birth or termination with questions about the pregnancy, delivery, and outcome of the children. These data were compared with data on spontaneously conceived singleton children from the Flemish register of perinatal epidemiology, which collects information from all Flemish obstetric units.


During the period, the overall percentage of SET as opposed to multiple embryo transfers was 33.2% The percentage of SET increased from 12.4% in 1998 to 53.8% in 2003, and the proportion of singleton pregnancies from IVF/ICSI from 66% in 1998 to 87% in 2003.

“We analysed the outcomes of the 251 SET pregnancies and births and found very little difference between the SET babies and those conceived naturally”, said Dr. De Neubourg. “Birth weight was very similar, and so was gestational age. Stillbirth was also the same in both groups. The only significant difference we found was that SET pregnancies reported more hypertension (7.6% as opposed to 4.6).

“We began this study because we wanted to investigate whether babies born after SET would have similarly poor obstetric outcomes to those reported from singleton births at the time when it was customary to transfer two or more embryos. We believe that our work shows clearly that SET is best both for mother and child. But we need to gain more data over a longer period of time. We intend to make a sub-analysis for different groups of patients and to further elucidate aspects of infertility and implantation.”

Health economic aspects of ART are becoming increasingly important, said Dr. De Neubourg. “It is clear that more singletons who are healthy will cost less to society. In Belgium this understanding has resulted in laboratory costs for IVF and ICSI being reimbursed under a strict embryo transfer policy to secure the prevention of multiple pregnancies.”

In another presentation, Dr. Anja Pinborg, from the Fertility Clinic at the Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, told the conference that the major health risks for IVF singleton babies came from their being the surviving twin from a dual embryo transfer. She and her team studied data collected between 1995 and 2001 from 11 Danish fertility clinics to assess the number of born IVF singletons in which a spontaneous reduction (‘vanishing twin’) occurred during pregnancy.

The team looked at the obstetric and long term outcomes of these singletons, and examined whether a poorer outcome for the babies was linked to the gestational age at the time of the spontaneous reduction. “Of all the IVF singletons born”, said Dr.Pinborg, “10.4% originated from a twin gestation in early pregnancy. We found a clear correlation between the incidence of neurological problems in these babies and the time of onset of spontaneous reduction – the later in pregnancy the twin was lost the higher the risk of neurological problems in the survivor. Furthermore, the risk of child death within the period of follow-up was higher in the survivors of a vanishing twin than in those born from a single gestation.”

Dr. Pinborg said that she considered that single embryo transfer (SET) should be recommended to women of less than 37 years of age with at least two high quality embryos available. “Perhaps the age criteria could be even higher – that depends on future studies”, she said. “We need to inform our patients that vanishing twins are a considerable risk factor in IVF twin pregnancies and a relatively common consequence of dual embryo transfer”, she said.

Mary Rice | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eshre.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Researchers target protein that protects bacteria's DNA 'recipes'
21.08.2018 | University of Rochester

nachricht Protein interaction helps Yersinia cause disease
21.08.2018 | Schwedischer Forschungsrat - The Swedish Research Council

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Air pollution leads to cardiovascular diseases

21.08.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Researchers target protein that protects bacteria's DNA 'recipes'

21.08.2018 | Life Sciences

A paper battery powered by bacteria

21.08.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>