Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Chamber reveals chemical secrets

02.06.2003



What if there were a magical chamber that could divulge the secrets of anything that was placed inside of it? Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed such a chamber—and while it won’t divulge all secrets, it discloses key information about chemicals and compounds.

That information may be useful in addressing a wide range of issues that affect the environment and quality of life—everything from sick building syndrome and industrial emissions monitoring and control to sensor testing for homeland security applications.

PNNL’s chamber, known as the Atmospheric Research Chamber, was developed in 2002. The chamber concept can be traced to PNNL’s work in fate and transport studies, which revealed that there is still much to learn about how chemicals react in the environment.



The chamber actually is a large, room-sized set of dual chambers that analyzes chemical mixtures by subjecting the material to an assortment of tests. These tests, for example, characterize unknown chemical substances; expose chemicals to photo-oxidation or high humidity to mimic what might actually happen in the environment; and effectively monitor aerosols and molds. In addition, the chamber can be used to calibrate sensitive sensors or detectors for interferences like dusts, oils or other chemicals.

Teflon-lined and containing ultraviolet lights, reflective surfaces, sampling and purge ports, stirring fans and state-of- the-art analysis equipment, the chamber also provides information that could be used for determining chemical and/or biological sensor detection issues and validating computational modeling by performing actual experiments that can be done without expensive field tests. The chamber is able to measure high-boiling point, semivolatile chemicals without critical surface and line losses, shed new light on air pollution and health issues for civilian and military populations and provide improved understanding of hazardous waste discharges for more effective cleanup solutions.

"With the chamber’s unique ability to work with semi-volatile chemicals and its powerful analytical capabilities, we feel that it can serve the needs of many different clients who would not be able to find the same capabilities elsewhere," said Kathy Probasco, senior research scientist. Probasco added the chamber’s capabilities are now available to external clients and projects.

Greg Koller | DOE/PNNL
Further information:
http://www.pnl.gov/news/index.html

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Microscope measures muscle weakness
16.11.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht Good preparation is half the digestion
16.11.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Stoffwechselforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>