Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Just the Two Of Us

23.11.2011
Stable Dinucleotide–RNA Duplexes Show Promise in Biotechnology

Nucleic acid technology has revolutionized the field of biomedicine, as it can be effectively utilized in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of genetic diseases.

The efficacy of most oligonucleotide therapies is, however, limited as a result of the lability of oligonucleotides in biological fluids and, in particular, their poor delivery to the site of action. A Swedish team headed by R. Strömberg recently reported in the European Journal of Organic Chemistry that modification of oligonucleotides with a 2'-O-carbamoyl moiety greatly increases the stability of these compounds, which may render their use in constructs for biotechnological and therapeutic applications viable.

Efficiency in the regulation of gene expression is readily achieved if turnover of the target RNA is obtained, but this can only occur if native enzymes recognize the relevant oligonucleotide complex. The ability to catalytically cleave a specific sequence of RNA at a specific site is of high potential value in biotechnology and oligonucleotide therapy. Thus, the development of oligonucleotide-based artificial nucleases (OBANs) as artificial enzymes capable of cleaving mRNA sequences arising from genetic or viral diseases is highly sought.

In this context, the scientists set out to modify oligonucleotides with the judicious choice of a 2'-carbamoylmethyl (CM) moiety. Substitution at the 2-position was an important prerequisite, as this has been shown to lead to the formation of stable duplexes with the target RNA, and it was also believed that the CM moiety could further increase the stability of the duplex through hydrogen bonding.

The team was able to show that the 2'-O-carbamoyl modification substantially protected the dinucleotide against enzyme-catalyzed degradation by phosphodiesterase I and made it virtually resistant to degradation by phosphodiesterase II. This, together with the reported increased thermal stability of the duplexes, makes the often-neglected 2'-O-carbamoyl moiety an interesting modification in the pursuit of future compounds that may one day help in the treatment of genetic diseases.

Author: Roger Strömberg, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden), http://www.bionut.ki.se/groups/rst/
Title: Stability of a 2'-O-(Carbamoylmethyl)adenosine-Containing Dinucleotide
European Journal of Organic Chemistry, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejoc.201101264

Roger Strömberg | Wiley-VCH
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

Further reports about: CHEMISTRY Organic RNA genetic disease viral disease

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New bioinformatics platform for the genome-based taxonomical classification of bacteria and archaea
21.05.2019 | Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH

nachricht 3D technology lets us look into the distant past
21.05.2019 | Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

Im Focus: A step towards probabilistic computing

Working group led by physicist Professor Ulrich Nowak at the University of Konstanz, in collaboration with a team of physicists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, demonstrates how skyrmions can be used for the computer concepts of the future

When it comes to performing a calculation destined to arrive at an exact result, humans are hopelessly inferior to the computer. In other areas, humans are...

Im Focus: Recording embryonic development

Scientists develop a molecular recording tool that enables in vivo lineage tracing of embryonic cells

The beginning of new life starts with a fascinating process: A single cell gives rise to progenitor cells that eventually differentiate into the three germ...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Planetologists explain how the formation of the moon brought water to Earth

21.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New Measurement Device: Carbon Dioxide As Geothermometer

21.05.2019 | Earth Sciences

New bioinformatics platform for the genome-based taxonomical classification of bacteria and archaea

21.05.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>