Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gene that controls susceptibility to tuberculosis discovered

13.05.2003


Investigators at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) have identified a gene that regulates the susceptibility to tuberculosis. This finding is published in this week’s edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Tuberculosis, an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, affects approximately 1.9 billion people worldwide. However, a large proportion of these individuals do not develop tuberculosis symptoms. Their body defense systems, or immune systems, are capable of controlling the growth of the bacteria.

"We have identified a gene that controls Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth in the lung," says MUHC microbiologist and senior author Dr. Philippe Gros. "This is an important step toward understanding why some infected individuals are able to fight off the infection and others are not. This discovery may lead to innovative prevention and treatment strategies for the 2 million patients who die from tuberculosis yearly."



Gros, also a professor of Biochemistry and Medicine at McGill University, along with his graduate student, Loukia Mitsosand, and his colleagues from the University of Oxford and the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake NY, used a mouse model and a technique called genome scanning to find the gene. They infected mice with air-borne bacteria and compared the DNA of those who were susceptible to infection with those who were not. A common gene variant on chromosome 19 was identified in those mice that were susceptible to infection. These mice had greater number of bacteria in their lungs and died earlier. "We believe that the gene variant, Trl-4, controls the growth of the bacteria in the lung. The next step is to test if this gene is present in humans who are susceptible to the disease," concludes Gros.


This study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, is available online at http://www.pnas.org.

For more information, please contact:
Christine Zeindler, MSc
Communications Coordinator (Research)
McGill University Health Centre Communications Services
514-934-1934 ext. 36419
pager: 514-406-1577


Christine Zeindler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcgill.ca/
http://www.pnas.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide
19.12.2018 | Universität Konstanz

nachricht Gut microbiome regulates the intestinal immune system, researchers find
19.12.2018 | Brown University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists to give artificial intelligence human hearing

19.12.2018 | Information Technology

Newly discovered adolescent star seen undergoing 'growth spurt'

19.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

From a plant sugar to toxic hydrogen sulfide

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>