Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists discover role for c-myc gene in tumor angiogenesis

01.10.2002


The c-myc gene is commonly activated in a variety of human tumors. As a new report in the October 1 issue of Genes & Development shows, scientists are gaining a better understanding as to why.



Dr. John Cleveland and colleagues at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered that c-Myc is essential for tumor development, as it regulates factors necessary for the growth of blood vessels into tumors – lending a new potential target to anti-angiogenic cancer therapies.

The myc family of oncogenes (c-myc, N-myc, and L-myc) function in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and tumorigenesis. Although it has long been recognized that c-Myc’s positive effect on cell proliferation can contribute to cancer development, scientists have also suspected that c-Myc has additional roles in the progression of malignancy. Dr. Cleveland and colleagues have discovered such a role: c-Myc is essential for tumor angiogenesis.


Growing tumors need oxygen and nutrients to survive. Once a tumor’s demand for oxygen and nutrients exceeds what the existing vasculature can provide, a new vascular network is established (vasculogenesis) and capillaries are formed (angiogenesis) to meet the tumor’s increasing needs. Since the late nineties, when the first anti-angiogenic drugs entered clinical trials, much interest has centered upon the therapeutic approach to thwart a tumor’s growth by cutting off its blood supply. By showing that c-Myc is essential for promoting vasculo- and angiogenesis, Dr. Cleveland and colleagues have uncovered another possible route in this anti-angiogenic strategy.

"The goal of this study was to determine the role of c-Myc in development. These studies established that c-Myc is essential for the formation of the vasculature that distributes blood throughout the organism, and that it did so by functioning as a master regulator of factors that are necessary for the growth of blood vessels and capillaries. The surprising result was that these studies also revealed why MYC family genes are activated in 70% of all human cancers," explains Dr. Cleveland.

To evaluate the physiological role of c-Myc, Dr. Cleveland and colleagues re-derived a strain of transgenic mice that are deficient in the gene. The c-myc-deficient mice die as embryos due to cardiac and neural defects, but also display marked defects in vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and the formation of red blood cells. The researchers found that the vascular defects in the c-Myc-deficient mice arise from the mis-expression of intercellular signals that coordinate vasculo- and angiogenesis during development.

Drs. Cleveland and Baudino and colleagues went on to show that c-Myc plays a similar role in orchestrating vasculogenesis during tumor formation. The researchers demonstrated that c-Myc-deficient embryonic stem cells have a diminished ability to form tumors in immunocompromised mice, and that the small tumors that sometimes form have dramatically less vasculature. Further delineation of role of c-Myc in promoting human tumorigenesis is needed, but as it stands, this study presents strong evidence to suggest that the disruption of c-Myc may prove successful as an anti-angiogenic tool in cancer therapy.

Heather Cosel | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.cshl.org/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Study reveals how bacteria build essential carbon-fixing machinery
09.07.2020 | University of Liverpool

nachricht Stress testing 'coral in a box'
09.07.2020 | University of Konstanz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material

New insight into the spin behavior in an exotic state of matter puts us closer to next-generation spintronic devices

Aside from the deep understanding of the natural world that quantum physics theory offers, scientists worldwide are working tirelessly to bring forth a...

Im Focus: Excitation of robust materials

Kiel physics team observed extremely fast electronic changes in real time in a special material class

In physics, they are currently the subject of intensive research; in electronics, they could enable completely new functions. So-called topological materials...

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing

09.07.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Record efficiency for printed solar cells

09.07.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Rock 'n' control

09.07.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>