Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

O2 stable hydrogenases for applications

23.07.2018

Progress in catalysis research

A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion and the MPI für Kohlenforschung in Mülheim an der Ruhr have succeeded in optimizing naturally occurring catalysts (hydrogenases) for application.


Dr. James Birrell & Dr. Patricia Rodríguez Maciá

MPI CEC

Hydrogen as an energy vector. Hydrogen gas (H2) has been proposed as an ideal energy vector. It can be produced from water, ideally using renewable energy sources and using an efficient catalyst to split water into H2 and oxygen (O2).

The H2 produced can then be stored as a fuel and consumed in a fuel cell to produce electricity on demand generating harmless water as a waste product. This technology is already available and can reach high efficiencies. Unfortunately, the catalysts required are based on rare and expensive metals like platinum.

Bio-hydrogen. Nature also employs H2 as a fuel, but instead of using precious metals, living organisms utilize enzymes as catalysts, and the catalyst of choice for H2 cycling are the hydrogenases. The active center of these enzymes contains earth-abundant metals like nickel and/or iron and can operate as efficiently as platinum. However, hydrogenases are very sensitive to oxygen and cannot be handled under air, complicating manipulation of them and therefore limiting their use in technological applications.

Producing “easy-to-handle” hydrogenases. Very recently, a team from the Mülheim-based Max Planck Institutes (Mülheim Chemistry Campus) have discovered a way to protect these sensitive enzymes from oxygen damage. Treating the purified hydrogenase with strong oxidizing agents in the presence of sulfide converted it to an oxygen stable form.

Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the oxygen-stable state obtained. The oxygen stable enzyme can then be stored and handled under air making it easy to employ in fuel cells or water splitting devices. This research provides a step forward towards the use of these enzymes in technological applications as well as in understanding the mechanism of inactivation by oxygen. It also provides clues for protecting synthetic molecular catalysts designed for hydrogen conversion and production.

Funding
The work was supported by the Max Planck Society and the Cluster of Excellence RESOLV (EXC1069) from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

Original publication
Patricia Rodríguez-Maciá, Edward J. Reijerse, Maurice van Gastel, Serena DeBeer, Wolfgang Lubitz, Olaf Rüdiger, and James A. Birrell. Sulfide Protects [FeFe] Hydrogenases From O2 J. Am. Chem. Soc. (Just Accepted Manuscript) DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b04339

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Dr. James Birrell
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion
Phone: +49-(0)208-306-3586
Email: james.birrell@cec.mpg.de

Originalpublikation:

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.8b04339

Weitere Informationen:

https://cec.mpg.de/pressemitteilungen/pressemitteilungen/

Christin Ernst M.A. | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Energiekonversion

Further reports about: Energy Hydrogen Max Planck Institute Max-Planck-Institut catalyst enzymes platinum

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Hidden dynamics detected in neuronal networks
23.07.2019 | Forschungszentrum Juelich

nachricht Towards a light driven molecular assembler
23.07.2019 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: MOF@SAW: Nanoquakes and molecular sponges for weighing and separating tiny masses

Augsburg chemists and physicists report how they have succeeded in the extremely difficult separation of hydrogen and deuterium in a gas mixture.

Thanks to the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) technology developed here and already widely used, the University of Augsburg is internationally recognized as the...

Im Focus: Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms

Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone. The scientists will publish the results shortly in the journal Nano Letters.

In the electronics and computer industry, components are becoming ever smaller and more powerful. However, there are problems with the heat generation. It is...

Im Focus: First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure

Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices.

Physicists from the University of Warwick and the University of Washington have developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in...

Im Focus: Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

Im Focus: Artificial neural network resolves puzzles from condensed matter physics: Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on UV LED Technologies & Applications – ICULTA 2020 | Call for Abstracts

24.06.2019 | Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Hidden dynamics detected in neuronal networks

23.07.2019 | Life Sciences

Towards a light driven molecular assembler

23.07.2019 | Life Sciences

A torque on conventional magnetic wisdom

23.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>