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NIH-funded scientists describe genesis, evolution of H7N9 influenza virus

22.08.2013
WHAT:
An international team of influenza researchers in China, the United Kingdom and the United States has used genetic sequencing to trace the source and evolution of the avian H7N9 influenza virus that emerged in humans in China earlier this year.

The study, published today in Nature, was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a component of the National Institutes of Health, and other organizations.

Working in three Chinese provinces, researchers led by Yi Guan, Ph.D., of the University of Hong Kong collected samples from the throats and digestive tracts of chickens, ducks, geese, pigeons and quail. Fecal and water samples from live poultry markets and the natural environment were also collected. From these samples, the researchers isolated several influenza viruses and genetically sequenced those of the H7N9 subtype as well as related H7N7 and H9N2 viruses. These sequences were compared with archived sequences of the same subtypes isolated in southern China between 2000 and 2013. The researchers compared the differences between the two sets of sequences to reconstruct how the H7N9 virus evolved through various species of birds and to determine the origin of genes.

According to their analysis, domestic ducks and chickens played distinct roles in the genesis of the H7N9 virus infecting humans today. Within ducks, and later within chickens, various strains of avian H7N9, H7N7 and H9N2 influenza exchanged genes with one another in different combinations. The resulting H7N9 virus began causing outbreaks among chickens in live poultry markets, from which many humans became infected. Given these results, the authors write, continued surveillance of influenza viruses in birds remains essential.

ARTICLE:

Lam T et al. The genesis and source of the H7N9 influenza viruses causing human infections in China. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature12515 (2013).

WHO:

NIAID director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.; David M. Morens, M.D., senior advisor to the NIAID director; and Diane Post, Ph.D., influenza program officer in NIAID's Respiratory Diseases Branch, are available to discuss the findings.

CONTACT:

To schedule interviews, please contact Nalini Padmanabhan, (301) 402-1663, nalini.padmanabhan@nih.gov.

NIAID conducts and supports research—at NIH, throughout the United States, and worldwide—to study the causes of infectious and immune-mediated diseases, and to develop better means of preventing, diagnosing and treating these illnesses. News releases, fact sheets and other NIAID-related materials are available on the NIAID Web site at http://www.niaid.nih.gov.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov/.

NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

Nalini Padmanabhan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nih.gov/

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