Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Newly discovered metabolism certifies evolutionary advantage for yeast

24.09.2015

Assumptions and models used in the last 30 years are false

Yeast is being used by mankind for longer time than any other microorganism. Bread, beer, wine - all of these could not be produced without Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) and other yeast species.


Electronmicroscopy of Pichia pastoris cells: normal yeast cells grown on glucose on the left. Clearly visible peroxisomes (Px), the organelles responsible for assimilation of methanol into cellular biomass on the right.

Credit: acib/University of Graz

Over the last decades yeast has become indispensable for industrial biotechnology as a reliable cell factory. Valuable products ranging from enzymes to active pharmaceutical ingredients are industrially produced using yeast, mostly by a species called Pichia pastoris that is particularly productive.

Because of its long and varied use, yeast is one of the best studied organisms. Besides its industrial application Pichia pastoris is also used by scientists as a model organism for studying cell structures. Everything seemed familiar - until this year.

Researchers of the Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (acib) and the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU) have elucidated a new pathway that makes the yeast Pichia pastoris unique. "We were able to show that the assumptions and models that have been used in the last 30 years are not right", explains Prof. Diethard Mattanovich (BOKU and head of the research area "Systems Biology & Microbial Cell Engineering" at acib).

The new pathway explains the utilization of methanol as "feed". Yeasts such as Pichia pastoris belong to the rare kind of microorganisms that are able to utilize this simple alcohol as nutrient. Mattanovich: "The cells use that option, for example, when they grow naturally in the sap of trees, where methanol is present."

The researchers around project leader Dr. Brigitte Gasser discovered amazing similarities with plants. These use carbon dioxide (CO2) as a nutrient and recycle the greenhouse gas in cell organelles called chloroplasts. Eventually CO2 is converted to biomass. Pichia works similarly: It converts methanol, which consists of one carbon atom like CO2, in a cell organelle called peroxisome.

The decisive role in both processes is the formation of chemical bonds between carbon atoms and the rearrangement into sugar molecules and other substances, which are necessary for the synthesis of biomass. "So far we did not know where these rearrangements are performed in the cells, and which genes control them", says Brigitte Gasser.

Just as little was known about the genetic encoding of this metabolism. Most cells have one gene available per protein and metabolic step. Pichia is evolutionarily on the safe side. All genes for methanol manipulation are duplicated, as Mattanovich and Gasser have discovered together with 13 scientists who were involved in this research project.

The genes do not only have an additional genetic information so that the appropriate reactions are located to the peroxisome. They are active only when methanol is present as a nutrient source.

For these findings, the researchers have re-evaluated the entire data, which have emerged in the recent years while improving Pichia pastoris biotechnologically at acib and BOKU. "The interpretation of our systems biology data revolutionized the understanding of cell biology", says Brigitte Gasser, delighted about the new knowledge of life processes on earth. The work was recently published in the prestigious journal BMC Biology. The results demonstrate the leading role of Vienna researchers when it comes to the biotech yeast Pichia pastoris.

###

Systems-level organization of yeast methylotrophic lifestyle, Rußmayer et al. 2015. BMC Biology 13:80, http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/13/80

About acib

The Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB) is an international research centre for industrial biotechnology with locations in Vienna, Graz, Innsbruck, Tulln, Hamburg and Bielefeld (D), Pavia (I), Barcelona (E) and Rzeszow (P). acib sees itself as a scientific and industrial network of 130+ partners, including Biomin, Biocrates, Boehringer Ingelheim RCV, Lonza, Sandoz, VTU Technology.

At acib, 200+ employees work on more than 70 research projects with the final goal to replace conventional industrial processes and products by more environmentally friendly and more economical approaches.

acib is owned by the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Graz University of Technology, the Universities of Innsbruck and Graz and the Styrian Joanneum Research. acib is financed by industrial and public contributions. The latter come from the Austrian Research Promotion Agency of the Republic of Austria (FFG), Standortagentur Tirol, Styrian Business Promotion Agency (SFG), the province of Lower Austria and the Vienna Business Agency.

Contact

Dr. Brigitte Gasser, acib/BOKU, +43 1 47654 6813, brigitte.gasser@boku.ac.at

Prof. Diethard Mattanovich, acib/BOKU, +43 1 47654 6569, diethard.mattanovich@boku.ac.at

DI Thomas Stanzer MA, public relations/acib GmbH, +43 316 873 9312, thomas.stanzer@acib.at

Diethard Mattanovich | EurekAlert!

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress
22.02.2019 | Lobachevsky University

nachricht How the intestinal fungus Candida albicans shapes our immune system
22.02.2019 | Exzellenzcluster Präzisionsmedizin für chronische Entzündungserkrankungen

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: (Re)solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars observed so far. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg played an important role in the observations.

In August 2017, two neutron stars were observed colliding, producing gravitational waves that were detected by the American LIGO and European Virgo detectors....

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

22.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

22.02.2019 | Materials Sciences

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

22.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>