Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Metal-organic frameworks feel the pressure of Argonne scientists

29.09.2008
New research may be a key step towards real-world uses of MOFs

Scientists at U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National laboratory are putting the pressure on metal-organic frameworks (MOF).

In MOF materials, metal ions can be connected by organic molecules to form scaffolding-like structures similar to a molecular Tinker toy. The struts that make up the framework structure do not fill space efficiently, in the way that Lego blocks might, leaving extra spaces in the structure which are capable of containing guest molecules.

Behaving as molecular-scale sponges these MOFs have wide ranging potential uses for filtering, capturing or detecting molecules such as carbon dioxide or hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

"By examining the framework at various pressures," scientist Karena Chapman said. "We found that the MOF compresses rapidly at high pressures."

Since the MOF frameworks do not fill space efficiently, the structures are particularly sensitive to even relatively moderate applied pressures. For any carbon dioxide or hydrogen gas storage applications, the MOF materials (which are generally formed as fine particles or small crystals) will need to be compressed into pellets to optimize the volume capacity (an important target parameter). This would subject the structure to pressures up to several gigapascals (GPa).

While a few GPa of pressure would have minimal impact on denser oxide-based materials, MOFs may show significant and possibly irreversible distortions to the structure and to the selective gas storage properties. Understanding how MOF materials can behave under pressure is an important step in taking MOF technology beyond the lab.

Chapman, along with Argonne scientists Gregory Halder and Peter Chupas, synthesized a Copper-Benzenetricarboxylate MOF and subjected the framework to various pressures inside a diamond anvil cell with and without pressure-transmitting fluids at the laboratory's Advanced Photon Source.

X-ray diffraction from the laboratory's Advanced Photon Source data showed a transition from the hard regime where pressure transmitting fluid penetrates the framework cavities to a soft regime where the MOF compresses concertedly.

This uncharacteristic behavior is caused by the presence of smaller molecules in the pressure-transmitting fluid that can permeate the framework's cavities. This leads to a supersaturated state that counteracts the external pressure until a threshold pressure is reached and the MOF rapidly compresses and cannot allow any additional guest molecules into the cavities.

"MOFs have wide and varied potential applications in the real world," Chapman said. "By exploring high pressure phenomenon, we come a step closer to realizing these advanced applications."

Brock Cooper | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.anl.gov

Further reports about: Argonne Framework GPa MOF Photon X-ray diffraction carbon dioxide organic molecule pressure structure

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New study finds distinct microbes living next to corals
22.05.2019 | Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

nachricht Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases
22.05.2019 | DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

Im Focus: A step towards probabilistic computing

Working group led by physicist Professor Ulrich Nowak at the University of Konstanz, in collaboration with a team of physicists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, demonstrates how skyrmions can be used for the computer concepts of the future

When it comes to performing a calculation destined to arrive at an exact result, humans are hopelessly inferior to the computer. In other areas, humans are...

Im Focus: Recording embryonic development

Scientists develop a molecular recording tool that enables in vivo lineage tracing of embryonic cells

The beginning of new life starts with a fascinating process: A single cell gives rise to progenitor cells that eventually differentiate into the three germ...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases

22.05.2019 | Life Sciences

New study finds distinct microbes living next to corals

22.05.2019 | Life Sciences

Stellar waltz with dramatic ending

22.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>