Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018

Regulating the lipid and physical asymmetry of a cell's membrane is critical to immune cell function, and researchers have now shown that by preventing loss of membrane asymmetry it's possible to control the immune response.

A cell's membrane is its natural barrier between the inside of a cell and the outside world -- composed of a double layer (bilayer) of lipids (such as fats, waxes, sterols, or fat-soluble vitamins). Intriguingly, it's been known for decades that the layer facing the inside of cells is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer.


A cell's membrane is composed of a bilayer of lipids, and the inside-facing layer is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer; the differences in membrane order between the inside and outside bilayer are both obvious and striking.

Credit: Joseph Lorent

This "lipid asymmetry," or lack of symmetry, is regulated via a variety of proteins and demands a high amount of energy from the cell. Since the cell invests resources toward keeping the lipids asymmetrically distributed equally between the two sides of the bilayer, the process is vital to its function. Dying cells, which permanently lose their lipid asymmetry, are targeted by the immune system for elimination.

Because different lipids create membranes with different physical properties, a group of McGovern Medical School researchers wondered whether different lipid compositions in the bilayer could also lead to different physical properties.

During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, in San Francisco, California, Joseph H. Lorent, a postdoctoral researcher, and Ilya Levental, an assistant professor, will present their work exploring lipid asymmetry's role in immune cell activation.

A variety of fluorescent probes can provide insights about the general physical properties of membranes. But these probes tend to stain both sides of the plasma membrane -- making it impossible to independently measure the two layers of the bilayer.

"To overcome it, we use a trick where we inject the probe directly inside single cells using a tiny glass syringe like the kind used for extracting nuclei out of cells for cloning," Lorent said. "This allows us to visualize specifically half of the membrane facing the [inside of the cell]."

Now the researchers could see the changes between the inside and outside bilayer. "The differences were obvious and striking," Lorent said. "By preventing the loss of membrane asymmetry, we inhibited the immune response."

The team found that adjusting the lipid asymmetry of the membrane was important to the immune cells functioning. "In the long run, by knowing how lipid asymmetry is involved in cell signaling, we might be able to 'tune' certain immune responses or even cell death through the regulation of lipid asymmetry," Levental said. "This might involve treatments for allergies, inflammation or possibly even cancer."

###

1873-Plat - "Structural determinants and functional consequences of protein association with membrane domains" is authored by Joseph Lorent, Blanca Barbara Diaz-Rohrer, Xubo Lin, Alex Gorfe, Kandice R. Levental and Ilya Levental. It will be presented at 11:45 a.m. PST Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018, in South, Level Two, Room 215-216 of the Moscone Center, South. Abstract: https://plan.core-apps.com/bpsam2018/abstract/598979c882021290aae09439cc3f6e68

MORE MEETING INFORMATION

ABOUT THE MEETING

Each year, the Biophysical Society Annual Meeting brings together more than 6,000 researchers working in the multidisciplinary fields representing biophysics. With more than 3,600 poster presentations, over 200 exhibits, and more than 20 symposia, the BPS Annual Meeting is the largest meeting of biophysicists in the world. Despite its size, the meeting retains its small-meeting flavor through its subgroup symposia, platform sessions, social activities and committee programs. The 62nd Annual Meeting will be held at the Moscone Center (South) in San Francisco, California.

PRESS REGISTRATION

The Biophysical Society invites professional journalists, freelance science writers and public information officers to attend its Annual Meeting free of charge. For press registration, contact Ellen Weiss at EWeiss@biophysics.org or the Media Line at the American Institute of Physics at media@aip.org or 301-209-3090.

NEWS RELEASES

Embargoed press releases describing in detail some of the breakthroughs to be discussed at the meeting are available on EurekAlert!, Newswise and Alpha Galileo or by contacting the Media Line at the American Institute of Physics at media@aip.org or 301-209-3090.

QUICK LINKS

Main Meeting Page: https://www.biophysics.org/2018meeting/Home/tabid/7117/Default.aspx

Symposia: https://www.biophysics.org/2018meeting/Program/ScientificSessions/Symposia/tabid/7192/Default.aspx

Desktop Planner: http://www.biophysics.org/2018meeting/GeneralInfo/MobileApp/tabid/7473/Default.aspx

ABOUT THE SOCIETY

The Biophysical Society, founded in 1958, is a professional, scientific Society established to encourage development and dissemination of knowledge in biophysics. The Society promotes growth in this expanding field through its annual meeting, monthly journal, and committee and outreach activities. Its 9,000 members are located throughout the U.S. and the world, where they teach and conduct research in colleges, universities, laboratories, government agencies, and industry. For more information on the Society, or the 2018 Annual Meeting, visit http://www.biophysics.org.

Media Contact

Julia Majors
media@aip.org
301-209-3090

http://www.biophysics.org

Julia Majors | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: Biophysical Society Lipid activities asymmetry bilayer immune immune cells

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells
19.07.2018 | Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY

nachricht NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts
18.07.2018 | New York Stem Cell Foundation

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>