Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Self-Inflicted Asymmetry

01.08.2012
Crystallization-induced asymmetric synthesis of nonracemic platinum(IV) polysulfide tris(chelate) complexes

Asymmetry of molecules can make the difference between a drug and a poison. It is therefore vital to control this parameter in synthesis. Polish researchers found how stirring a reaction mixture in the presence of suitable seeding crystals can strongly affect the products. They report their findings in the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.

Witold Rybak and co-workers at the University of Wroc³aw investigated the synthesis of a platinum(IV) polysulfide anionic complex (NH4)2[Pt(S5)3]•2H2O and observed that vigorous stirring during the preparation played a unique role in determining the properties of the product obtained. Without stirring, the product was racemic, its composition did not depend upon the reactants or on the crystals used for seeding.

When the reaction mixture was stirred vigorously during the whole synthesis in the presence of a particular seeding crystal, however, the properties of the product were surprisingly similar to those of the seeding crystal used. This observation and the accompanying study also led to the elucidation of the mechanism of this chiral synthesis.

Previously, the asymmetric transformation of the reaction product during crystallization was believed to determine the properties of the final product obtained; however, this assumption had not been able to explain some experimental observations. A closer study has now led to the recognition of the true mechanism: the reason behind the formation of a product of a certain configuration is a crystallization-induced autocatalytic asymmetric synthesis mechanism. The seeding crystal molecule catalyzes the formation of more molecules of its own kind.

This discovery can be used to synthesize products of the desired chirality by selecting the seeding crystal with the right configuration and performing the synthesis under continuous stirring.

Author: Witold Rybak, Uniwersytet Wroc³awski (Poland), http://faculty.pages.wchuwr.pl/pracownik/WitoldRybak/en
Title: Crystallization-Induced Asymmetric Synthesis of Nonracemic Platinum(IV) Polysulfide Tris(chelate) Complexes

European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry , 2012, No. 23, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ejic.201200479

Witold Rybak | Wiley-VCH
Further information:
http://www.wiley-vch.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare their host for any eventuality
14.10.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Marine Mikrobiologie

nachricht Diagnostics for everyone
14.10.2019 | Max-Planck-Institut für Kolloid- und Grenzflächenforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel Material for Shipbuilding

A new research project at the TH Mittelhessen focusses on the development of a novel light weight design concept for leisure boats and yachts. Professor Stephan Marzi from the THM Institute of Mechanics and Materials collaborates with Krake Catamarane, which is a shipyard located in Apolda, Thuringia.

The project is set up in an international cooperation with Professor Anders Biel from Karlstad University in Sweden and the Swedish company Lamera from...

Im Focus: Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies. Materials only become superconductors - meaning that electrons can travel in them with no resistance - at very low temperatures. These days, this unique zero resistance superconductivity is commonly found in a number of technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Future technologies, however, will harness the total synchrony of electronic behavior in superconductors - a property called the phase. There is currently a...

Im Focus: How Do the Strongest Magnets in the Universe Form?

How do some neutron stars become the strongest magnets in the Universe? A German-British team of astrophysicists has found a possible answer to the question of how these so-called magnetars form. Researchers from Heidelberg, Garching, and Oxford used large computer simulations to demonstrate how the merger of two stars creates strong magnetic fields. If such stars explode in supernovae, magnetars could result.

How Do the Strongest Magnets in the Universe Form?

Im Focus: Liquifying a rocky exoplanet

A hot, molten Earth would be around 5% larger than its solid counterpart. This is the result of a study led by researchers at the University of Bern. The difference between molten and solid rocky planets is important for the search of Earth-like worlds beyond our Solar System and the understanding of Earth itself.

Rocky exoplanets that are around Earth-size are comparatively small, which makes them incredibly difficult to detect and characterise using telescopes. What...

Im Focus: Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion – first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics.

The team found signatures of axion particles composed of Weyl-type electrons (Weyl fermions) in the correlated Weyl semimetal (TaSe₄)₂I. At room temperature,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Symposium on Functional Materials for Electrolysis, Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

02.10.2019 | Event News

NEXUS 2020: Relationships Between Architecture and Mathematics

02.10.2019 | Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

How to control friction in topological insulators

14.10.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

The shelf life of pyrite

14.10.2019 | Earth Sciences

Shipment tracking for "fat parcels" in the body

14.10.2019 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>