Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New gene transfer strategy shows promise for limb girdle and other muscular dystrophies

09.07.2012
The challenge of treating patients with genetic disorders in which a single mutated gene is simply too large to be replaced using traditional gene therapy techniques may soon be a thing of the past.

A Nationwide Children's Hospital study describes a new gene therapy approach capable of delivering full-length versions of large genes and improving skeletal muscle function. The strategy may hold new hope for treating dysferlinopathies and other muscular dystrophies.

A group of untreatable muscle disorders known as dysferlinopathies are caused by mutations in the dysferlin gene. Patients with these disorders, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, are typically diagnosed in their early twenties. Approximately one-third will become wheelchair dependent by their mid-30s.

Gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) to deliver genes to cells has been pursued as an option for some patients with muscular dystrophy. However, AAV's packaging limitations have served as obstacles in using gene therapy to deliver large genes like dysferlin. Scientists in the past have attempted to work around AAV's packaging limitations by inserting a small version of large genes into the viral vector to induce gene expression. Some have also used more than one viral vector at a time to deliver a large gene. However, micro and mini versions of large genes don't always have the power of full-length gene expression and an increased viral load can lead to negative side effects.

"We have had success in the clinic using AAV gene therapy with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D, which is caused by mutations in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene," said Louise Rodino-Klapac, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Gene Therapy at The Research Institute of Nationwide Children's Hospital. "However, the dysferlin gene is very large, about six times larger than the alpha-sarcoglycan gene and can't fit into a traditional AAV vector."

A 2008 study identified AAV5, an AAV serotype that could package large transcripts. "This made us wonder whether it could be used for gene replacement requiring inserts as large as the dysferlin gene," said Dr. Rodino-Klapac.

In their 2012 study appearing in PLoS ONE, Dr. Rodino-Klapac's team used AAV5 to package a full-length, intact dysferlin gene and directly deliver it to the diaphragm of dysferlin-deficient mice. They also injected the leg muscles of dysferlin-deficient mice using both intramuscular and vascular approaches to further evaluate whether the gene delivery could improve skeletal muscle function.

They found that both the intravascular and intramuscular delivery approaches led to full-length, intact dysferlin gene expression in the leg and diaphragm muscle cells of the mice. More importantly, they saw that the newly-restored dysferlin repaired membrane deficits previously seen in the dysferlin-deficient mice.

"Our findings demonstrate highly favorable results with full restoration of dysferlin without compromise in function," said Dr. Rodino-Klapac. "With regard to neuromuscular diseases, these studies provide new perspective for conditions caused by mutations of large genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common severe childhood muscular dystrophy and would seem to benefit from expression of the larger transcripts than mini- and micro-dystrophins that only partially restore physiologic function in mouse models of the disease."

Dr. Rodino-Klapac and her team are currently defining a path for a dysferlin clinical gene therapy trial. "We have shown that AAV5-dysferlin delivery is a very promising therapeutic approach that could restore functional deficits in dysferlinopathy patients," she says.

Grose WE, Clark KR, Griffin D, Malik V, Shontz KM, Montgomery CL, Lewis S, Brown RH Jr, Janssen PM, Mendell JR, Rodino-Klapac LR. Homologous Recombination Mediates Functional Recovery of Dysferlin Deficiency following AAV5 Gene Transfer. PLoS One. 2012;7(6):e39233. Epub 2012 Jun 15.

For more information on the Center for Gene Therapy, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/center-for-gene-therapy
For more information on The Research Institute, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/pediatric-research

For more information on Dr. Louise Rodino-Klapac, visit http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/louise-rodino-klapac

Erin Pope | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nationwidechildrens.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A Varied Menu
25.03.2019 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht Key evidence associating hydrophobicity with effective acid catalysis
25.03.2019 | Tokyo Metropolitan University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The taming of the light screw

DESY and MPSD scientists create high-order harmonics from solids with controlled polarization states, taking advantage of both crystal symmetry and attosecond electronic dynamics. The newly demonstrated technique might find intriguing applications in petahertz electronics and for spectroscopic studies of novel quantum materials.

The nonlinear process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in gases is one of the cornerstones of attosecond science (an attosecond is a billionth of a...

Im Focus: Magnetic micro-boats

Nano- and microtechnology are promising candidates not only for medical applications such as drug delivery but also for the creation of little robots or flexible integrated sensors. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have created magnetic microparticles, with a newly developed method, that could pave the way for building micro-motors or guiding drugs in the human body to a target, like a tumor. The preparation of such structures as well as their remote-control can be regulated using magnetic fields and therefore can find application in an array of domains.

The magnetic properties of a material control how this material responds to the presence of a magnetic field. Iron oxide is the main component of rust but also...

Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

Im Focus: Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

Im Focus: Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Modelica Conference with 330 visitors from 21 countries at OTH Regensburg

11.03.2019 | Event News

Selection Completed: 580 Young Scientists from 88 Countries at the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

01.03.2019 | Event News

LightMAT 2019 – 3rd International Conference on Light Materials – Science and Technology

28.02.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Laser processing is a matter for the head – LZH at the Hannover Messe 2019

25.03.2019 | Trade Fair News

A Varied Menu

25.03.2019 | Life Sciences

‘Time Machine’ heralds new era

25.03.2019 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>