Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gallbladder cancer: Pharmacist finds protein that drives tumour growth – new therapeutic approach

25.10.2017

Patients with gallbladder cancer often show few or no symptoms for long periods of time. As a result, the tumours are only detected at a late stage of the disease when treatment is often no longer possible. Working in collaboration with pathologists at the University of Magdeburg, Sonja M. Kessler, a research pharmacist in the group led by Professor Alexandra K. Kiemer at Saarland University, has identified a new pathway that may allow improved prognosis and treatment of the disease. Kessler has discovered a protein that is linked with tumour growth and that functions as a prognostic marker, thus providing an indication of how the cancer may progress.

The results have been published in the specialist journal ‘Oncotarget’. DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.21116

The three proteins usually targeted by pharmacist Sonja M. Kessler in her research work are known to play an important role in embryos in the womb. These proteins help to ensure the rapid growth and development of the unborn child. After birth, however, these proteins typically play no further role.


Research pharmacist Sonja M. Kessler from Saarland University has succeeded in linking a protein group to gallbladder cancer.

Ehrlich

‘All of these proteins are switched off after birth and they are no longer copied from the child’s genetic blueprint,’ explains licenced pharmacist Dr. Sonja M. Kessler, who is carrying out research at Saarland University in the group run by Professor Alexandra K. Kiemer for her Habilitation – the advanced research degree that entitles the holder to teach at professorial level within the German higher education system. However, it turns out that this family of proteins with the unremarkable names IMP1 to 3 can be switched on again. And if that happens, they can cause a lot of harm. Of the three proteins, IMP2 is particularly hostile: ‘Because IMP2 promotes cell division and proliferation, it also drives the growth of tumours,’ explains Kessler.

Research pharmacist Kessler has now succeeded in linking the protein group to gallbladder cancer. ‘We were able to identify the proteins in a large number of tissue samples from gallbladder patients. We were also able to show that the tumour grows faster when the cells contain larger amounts of the IMP2 protein. And in those cases patient prognosis is poorer,’ says Kessler.

... more about:
»Biology »gallbladder »proteins »tumour »tumour growth

This result from a basic research programme may in future help to improve gallbladder treatment. ‘Up until now there have been very few prognostic markers for this tumour,’ says Sonja Kessler. Prognostic markers are substances in blood or tissue samples that indicate that a malignant cancer is likely to have a poor outcome for the patient.

Currently available treatment options can therefore be tailored more closely to the patient’s needs, which may help to improve clinical outcomes. IMP2 represents an important and potentially useful prognostic marker for gallbladder cancer. The results of Kessler’s research may also provide the basis for new effective drug treatments. Once the participating protein has been identified, research can be undertaken to influence, slow or even completely prevent the harmful processes that are set in motion by the protein.

Kessler’s research was conducted in collaboration with Johannes Haybaeck, Professor of Pathology at the University of Magdeburg, who has built up the world’s largest collection of almost 500 tissue samples from gallbladder cancer patients.

With the help of the tissue bank, Dr. Kessler was able to identify the protein IMP2 as a completely new player in gallbladder cancer. Experimentally, the IMP proteins in the tissue samples were made visible and analysed with the help of marked antibodies.

Press photographs are available at http://www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos and can be used at no charge.

Contact: Dr. Sonja M. Kessler (Department of Pharmaceutical Biology):
Tel.: +49 (0)681 302-57314; E-mail: s.kessler@mx.uni-saarland.de
Prof. Dr. Alexandra K. Kiemer (Department of Pharmaceutical Biology)
Tel.: +49 (0)681 302-57301; E-mail: pharm.bio.kiemer@mx.uni-saarland.de

Note for radio journalists: Studio-quality telephone interviews can be conducted using broadcast audio IP codec technology (IP direct dial or via the ARD node 106813020001). Interview requests should be addressed to the university’s Press and Public Relations Office (+49 (0)681 302-64091 or -2601).

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.impactjournals.com/oncotarget/index.php?journal=oncotarget&page=a... - "IMP2/IGF2BP2 expression, but not IMP1 and IMP3, predicts poor outcome in patients and high tumor growth rate in xenograft models of gallbladder cancer" DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.21116

Claudia Ehrlich | Universität des Saarlandes

Further reports about: Biology gallbladder proteins tumour tumour growth

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs
18.04.2019 | University of Hawaii at Manoa

nachricht New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection
18.04.2019 | Polytechnique Montréal

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

Im Focus: Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties

Engineers create novel optical devices, including a moth eye-inspired omnidirectional microwave antenna

A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>