Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First transcription atlas of all wheat genes expands prospects for research and cultivation

17.08.2018

Today the complete wheat genome (Triticum aestivum) has been published in “Science”. This sequence is the “anchor genome” for capturing the complete genetic diversity of wheat, which is a global food crop. A second publication in the same magazine describes the first opportunities this will create for scientists and practitioners.

Knowledge of the function of the genes, if possible all genes, in an organism is crucial. The expression of genes at various points in time, in various organs and under different environmental influences is a starting point for acquiring this knowledge. The transcription atlas now published for the wheat genome shows the direction in which research is developing.


Under the leadership of the John Innes Centre in Norwich (England), scientists from seven countries and 17 research institutes took part in the study. The German researchers were from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) in Gatersleben and the Helmholtz Centre in Munich.

For their study, the scientists analysed over 800 hundred expression data sets from 28 studies. They combined these with the fully annotated genome sequence to create a transcription atlas. The challenge here was not only the size but also the particular structure of the wheat genome. The wheat genome is polyploid, and is composed of three individual genomes with different antecedents.

In their study, the scientists give a very comprehensive insight into the spatiotemporal transcription landscape of polyploid wheat. “For the first time we are in a position to assign the proportions in the expression of characteristics to individual sub-genomes and to analyse the gene expression with the help of regulatory networks,” says Prof. Dr. Andrea Bräutigam (University of Bielefeld since October 2017), who participated in the project at the Leibniz Institute for Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research.

“Striking is, that major differences in gene expression exist particularly at the ends of the chromosomes, coding for agronomically important traits.”, continues Bräutigam. The pre-condition for the study was the exact annotation of sequences. This took place at the Helmholtz Centre in Munich.

“Annotation of the genes, and the creation of family trees is the basis for clarifying structure and function. We were able to identify the gene loci precisely with specially developed algorithms,” according to Dr. Daniel Lang of the Helmholtz Centre in Munich.

Prof. Dr. Cristobal Uauy, Principal Investigator of the study at the John Innes Centre, says: “Our understanding of genomes has led to a dramatic progress in breeding and cultivation practices for other crops such as maize or rice. With the complete wheat genome available now, and follow-up work, it will be possible to identify genes in wheat more precisely and faster. This knowledge will help researchers and growers to use the allelic variations of polyploid wheat to improve targeted characteristics.”

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Prof. Dr. Andrea Bräutigam Phone: (+49) (0)521 106 8753
E-mail: andrea.braeutigam@uni-bielefeld.de

Dr. Manuel Spannagl, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Research Unit Plant Genome and Systems Biology, Ingolstädter Landstraße 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Tel. +49 89 3187 3584, +49 89 3187 3948,
E-mail: manuel.spannagl@helmholtz-muenchen.de
Dr. Daniel Lang, Tel. +49 89 3187 3583
E-mail: daniel.lang@helmholtz-muenchen.de

Prof. Dr. Cristobal Uauy
E-mail: Cristobal.Uauy@jic.ac.uk

Originalpublikation:

R. H. Ramírez-González et al. (2018): The transcriptional landscape of polyploid wheat (http://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.aar6089). Science, DOI: 10.1126/science.aar6089

Weitere Informationen:

http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/plantsdb.jsp
http://www.ipk-gatersleben.de/
https://www.jic.ac.uk/directory/cristobal-uauy/
http://www.wheatgenome.org/

Regina Devrient | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Leibniz-Institut Plant Genetics cultivation genes genomes wheat

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress
22.02.2019 | Lobachevsky University

nachricht How the intestinal fungus Candida albicans shapes our immune system
22.02.2019 | Exzellenzcluster Präzisionsmedizin für chronische Entzündungserkrankungen

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: (Re)solving the jet/cocoon riddle of a gravitational wave event

An international research team including astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has combined radio telescopes from five continents to prove the existence of a narrow stream of material, a so-called jet, emerging from the only gravitational wave event involving two neutron stars observed so far. With its high sensitivity and excellent performance, the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg played an important role in the observations.

In August 2017, two neutron stars were observed colliding, producing gravitational waves that were detected by the American LIGO and European Virgo detectors....

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

JILA researchers make coldest quantum gas of molecules

22.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Understanding high efficiency of deep ultraviolet LEDs

22.02.2019 | Materials Sciences

Russian scientists show changes in the erythrocyte nanostructure under stress

22.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>