Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Blood runs deep: Lab blood vessel model sheds light on angiogenesis

31.01.2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.

To shed light on this issue, Prof. Yukiko T. Matsunaga's research group based at The University of Tokyo working in collaboration within the international SMMiL-E project with the team of Dr. Fabrice Soncin at CNRS in Lille, France, used a model of a blood vessel created in the lab to study how a molecule called EGFL7 is involved in blood vessel sprouting and integrity.


Prof. Yukiko T. Matsunaga's research group used a model of a blood vessel created in the lab to study how a molecule called EGFL7 is involved in blood vessel sprouting and integrity.

Credit: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

This new study, reported in the journal Biomaterials, reveals much about the formation of new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis, and suggests EGFL7 as a good target for treating diseases in which this process plays a key role.

Such research on angiogenesis is important in a clinical context. For example, when solid tumors form, they need to promote angiogenesis to obtain an adequate blood supply in order to keep growing.

Reduced integrity of blood vessels is also an issue in various diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, in which vessels in the retina are excessively leaky and their network structure gradually deteriorates. This background prompted the teams to use their model, called a microvessel-on-a-chip, to understand angiogenesis better.

"We obtained more insight into how blood vessels form by building our own in the lab from scratch, first forming a collagen mold containing a needle that was then removed, leaving a space that was then colonized by human umbilical vein endothelial cells," corresponding author Yukiko T. Matsunaga says.

"We next examined the effects of EGFL7 by comparing two models of this type, one in which this molecule was allowed to function normally in these cells and another in which it was knocked down by siRNA."

The teams showed that an absence of EGFL7 reduced the sprouting of new blood vessels in the microvessel-on-a-chip in a manner dependent on the molecule VEGF-A. It also led to excessive production of filopodia, which are long slender structures at which new blood vessels normally emerge. Additionally, they showed that the barrier normally formed by the endothelial cells was impaired, resulting in leakage from the vessels.

"These new findings about the importance of EGFL7 could lead to effective therapies for diseases like retinopathy and cancer," lead author Ryo Usuba says. "Our work also shows the advantages of using the microvessel-on-a-chip, both for basic research on the vasculature and in pursuit of other targets of treatment for various vascular disorders."

###

The article "EGFL7 regulates sprouting angiogenesis and endothelial integrity in a human blood vessel model" is published in Biomaterials at doi: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2019.01.022.

About Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo

Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), the University of Tokyo is one of the largest university-attached research institutes in Japan.

More than 120 research laboratories, each headed by a faculty member, comprise IIS, with more than 1,000 members including approximately 300 staff and 700 students actively engaged in education and research. Our activities cover almost all the areas of engineering disciplines. Since its foundation in 1949, IIS has worked to bridge the huge gaps that exist between academic disciplines and real-world applications.

Media Contact

Yukiko Matsunaga
mat@iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp
81-354-526-470

https://www.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/ 

Yukiko Matsunaga | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://www.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp/en/news/3040/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2019.01.022

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Antibiotic resistances spread faster than so far thought
18.02.2019 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht The Lypla1 Gene Impacts Obesity in a Sex-Specific Manner
18.02.2019 | Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

The Internet of Things: TU Graz researchers increase the dependability of smart systems

18.02.2019 | Interdisciplinary Research

Laser Processes for Multi-Functional Composites

18.02.2019 | Process Engineering

Scientists Create New Map of Brain’s Immune System

18.02.2019 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>