Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Biomarkers predict long-term outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

13.06.2014

Different mechanisms of response could explain poor treatment response in rheumatoid factor positive patients

Data presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) demonstrate the possibility of using biomarkers (developed from whole blood gene expression profiles) in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to predict the status of their disease at 12 months. The long-term disease status at 12 months was accurately predicted only after treatment had been initiated, in newly diagnosed patients.1

JIA is the most common childhood* chronic rheumatic disease,2 affecting 16-150 children in every 100,000. As indicated by the name, the cause of JIA is largely unknown.3

"By predicting disease progression in these young children we can better understand the course of the disease and how best to treat the individual," said lead author of the study Professor James Jarvis, from the Department of Paediatrics, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

Blood gene expression profiling has led to major advances in the field of rheumatology over the last decade but to date it has only been possible to predict therapeutic outcome at 6 months.4

"The challenge was to test the feasibility of using these prognostic biomarkers from whole blood gene expression profiles in children with newly diagnosed JIA to predict disease status at one year," explained Professor Jarvis. "Baseline expression profiles that could predict disease status at six months could not predict status at 12 months. However, using four month data (the earliest point at which samples were collected from children on treatment) we were able to determine strong predictive properties for disease status at 12 months. Thus, after children had initiated therapy longer term outcome was predictable," Professor Jarvis said.

In this study, researchers also discovered the appearance of different mechanisms of response in Rheumatoid Factor (RF) positive† and RF negative patients after four months of therapy, a finding that could explain the relative refractoriness of RF positive patients to otherwise effective therapies.

Whole blood expression profiles were studied from children enrolled in the TREAT study, an NIH‡-funded clinical trial comparing methotrexate (MTX) with MTX + etanercept in children with newly-diagnosed JIA. Gene expression profiles were examined to determine those genes whose expression levels best predicted outcome (active vs. inactive disease) at 12 months.

Researchers have described seven types of JIA, which are distinguished by their signs and symptoms, the number of joints affected, the results of laboratory tests, and the family history.3 In general, symptoms include joint pain, swelling, tenderness and stiffness that last for more than six continuous weeks; the condition can also affect the eyes and lymph nodes.3

###

Abstract Number: OP0187

NOTES TO EDITORS: For further information on this study, or to request an interview with the study lead, please contact us via: EULAR congress Press Office: Room 104, Palais des congrès de Paris Email: eularpressoffice@cohnwolfe.com Onsite tel: +44 (0) 7880 173209 Twitter: @EULAR_Press

About EULAR

The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) is an umbrella organisation which represents scientific societies, health professional associations and organisations for people with rheumatic diseases throughout Europe.

EULAR aims to promote, stimulate and support the research, prevention, and treatment of rheumatic diseases and the rehabilitation of those it affects.

With 45 scientific member societies, 35 People with Arthritis and Rheumatism in Europe (PARE) organisations, 17 health professionals associations and 26 corporate members, EULAR highlights the importance of combating rheumatic diseases through both medical means and patient care.

EULAR 2014 is set to be the biggest rheumatology event in Europe with almost 14,000 scientists, physicians, allied health professionals and related audiences in attendance from 130 countries. Over the course of the congress there will be 302 oral and 1,806 poster abstract presentations, 155 sessions, 725 lectures, 33 poster tours with 421 invited speakers.

To find out more about the activities of EULAR, visit: http://www.eular.org

1 Yao J, Jiang K, Franks MB et al. Developing prognostic biomarkers from whole blood expression profiling in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Influence of early therapy on treatment outcome. EULAR 2014; Paris: OP0187

2 Ravelli A, Martini A. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Lancet 2007;369:767

3 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Juv_Arthritis/default.asp#2 [Accessed 05/06/2014]

4 Jiang K, Sawle AD, Barton Frank M, et al. Whole blood gene expression profiling predicts therapeutic response at six months in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Arthritis Rheumatol 2014; 66 (5): 1363-71

* Under the age of 16

†Rheumatoid factor is an autoantibody produced in large amounts in adults with rheumatoid arthritis, which may also rarely be detected in children with JIA

‡National Institutes of Health

EULAR Press Office | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Arthritis EULAR Gene Expression JIA Rheumatoid Factor biomarkers diseases idiopathic therapy

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Colorectal cancer risk factors decrypted
13.07.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Stoffwechselforschung

nachricht Algae Have Land Genes
13.07.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>