Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Collaboration at EMSL produces innovative mass spectrometer

02.06.2003


The future of proteomics is in good hands with one of the most powerful and versatile mass spectrometers being developed by scientists and engineers from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.



The high-throughput Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer and automated liquid chromatography (LC) system is a breakthrough in mass spectrometry capable of improving the understanding of protein production, function and interactions at the cellular level and beyond.

Proteomics is the study of proteins in the human genome that are made and change within a cell over time as the cells respond to disease or changes in their surrounding environment.


"The success of the high- throughput FTICR mass spectrometer and the automation system heralds the next generation of proteomics research," said Harold Udseth, technical leader of EMSL’s High Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility.

Mass spectrometers are used to weigh atoms and molecules. This can be done with a precision of one part in five million, which, when applied to the human cell, will enable scientists to learn a great deal about how the cell works. "And once scientists fully understand how human cells work, they can begin to work on methodically solving problems involving things that go wrong in a cell such as cancer," Udseth said.

"The signature of the newest, high-throughput FTICR is the high resolution and high mass measurement accuracy of the system," Udseth continued. "It does better than other mass spectrometers available in measuring the mass of peptides (small structural units obtained by cutting proteins into pieces). It offers such sensitivity and precision that scientists can detect hundreds of thousands of peptide species in a single analysis." Identifying peptides is an important part of proteomics research to determine the role that proteins play in cells and living systems. Researchers expect that more than a million peptides are available in the proteins expressed within human cells.

The mass spectrometer project took nine months of concerted effort by a diverse team composed of scientists from the High Performance Mass Spectrometry Facility and engineers at the EMSL Instrument Development Laboratory (IDL), both of whom brought diverse talent and experience to the table. "It’s essential to get the right people in the right place, people who have a desire to work together for a common goal," Udseth said. "In this case, everyone was inspired by the work."

The project required the replacement of the instrument’s commercial ion manipulation optics with EMSL’s patented ion funnel technology, as well as the design, development and construction of an automated LC system that incorporates a commercial autosampler and PNNL’s high-pressure LC technology. Software written by researchers at EMSL is used to control the LC system and integrate it into a single operating system.

"We worked closely with Harold and his staff to understand and provide technical support to overcome the unique challenges of developing this cutting-edge research equipment," said Gordon Anderson, manager of the IDL. The IDL is an integral part of EMSL and includes staff with expertise in electronic circuit design and fabrication as well as software development. "Finding that common, underlying language between scientists and engineers paved the way to a satisfying collaboration," Anderson said.


A multidisciplinary team composed of scientists and engineers was key to the successful development of the cutting-edge, high-throughput Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. The research tool significantly accelerates proteome analysis and provides accuracy and depth never before reached in proteome studies. This ability greatly enhances the understanding of protein production, function and interactions at the cellular level.

Greg Koller | DOE/PNNL
Further information:
http://www.emsl.pnl.gov
http://www.emsl.pnl.gov:2080/docs/idl/home.html
http://www.pnl.gov/breakthroughs/winter-spring03/special_report3.stm#fticr

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht Decoding the regulation of cell survival - A major step towards preventing neurons from dying
04.10.2018 | DFG-Forschungszentrum für Regenerative Therapien TU Dresden

nachricht New Cluster of Excellence “Centre for Tactile Internet with Human-in-the-Loop” (CeTI)
28.09.2018 | Technische Universität Dresden

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

Im Focus: Nanorobots propel through the eye

Scientists developed specially coated nanometer-sized vehicles that can be actively moved through dense tissue like the vitreous of the eye. So far, the transport of nano-vehicles has only been demonstrated in model systems or biological fluids, but not in real tissue. The work was published in the journal Science Advances and constitutes one step further towards nanorobots becoming minimally-invasive tools for precisely delivering medicine to where it is needed.

Researchers of the “Micro, Nano and Molecular Systems” Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, together with an international...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

In focus: Peptides, the “little brothers and sisters” of proteins

12.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Materials scientist creates fabric alternative to batteries for wearable devices

12.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

A two-atom quantum duet

12.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>