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‘Time Machine’ heralds new era

25.03.2019

(Time) travel: One of the most advanced AI systems is currently being developed.

A few days ago, the European Commission selected the Europe-wide Time Machine project as one of the six proposals to be strategically developed in the coming decade. It is already being propelled by more than 200 partners. These six proposals will be funded with an initial amount of 1 million Euro to prepare detailed roadmaps for large-scale research initiatives.


Time Machine foresees to design and implement advanced new digitisation and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies to uncover Europe’s vast cultural heritage, providing fair and free access to information. Dr. Sander Münster from the TU Dresden Media Centre is certain that “this information will support future scientific and technological developments in Europe.” Together with Stephan Schwartzkopff, he heads the German coordination office at TU Dresden.

The project makes it possible to virtually travel through the history of Europe, just as easily as travelling from one place to another. What did this road look like 500 years ago? Which names and faces played a role at that time? The past thus becomes an easily accessible source in the search for solutions to future challenges.

“Time Machine will create advanced AI technologies to make sense of vast amounts of information from complex historical data sets”, explains Dr. Münster. This will enable the transformation of fragmented data – with content ranging from medieval manuscripts and historical objects to smartphone and satellite images – into useable knowledge for industry. In essence, a large-scale computing and digitisation infrastructure will map Europe’s entire social, cultural and geographical evolution.

Considering the unprecedented scale and complexity of the data, the Time Machine’s AI even has the potential to constitute a strong competitive advantage for Europe in the global AI race.
“Time Machine is likely to become one of the most advanced Artificial Intelligence systems ever built”, states Frederic Kaplan, professor of Digital Humanities at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and project coordinator of Time Machine.

This constant source of new knowledge will be an economic motor, giving rise to new professions, services and products in areas such as education, creative industries, policy making, smart tourism, smart cities and environmental modelling.

“We will therefore mark a new age for Social Sciences and Humanities, discover our cultural heritage as our most valuable economic asset and build a unique alliance and network of cities, regions and institutions”, says Dr. Münster.

In addition to the university, the Europe-wide project has 13 members from Dresden: Fachhochschule Dresden, University of Applied Sciences, Dresden Academy of Fine Arts, Saxon State and University Library, Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development, Society for Media in Science, DRESDEN-concept, Dresden State Archives, Dresden City Museum, Silicon Saxony, IPROconsult GmbH, Softwareparadies GmbH, as well as design Xpress. This makes Dresden the city with the most institutions involved in the Time Machine project.

Currently there are 16 additional local ‘Time Machines’. The Dresden Time Machine sees itself as a virtual network and pursues the goal of using digital technologies for digitalisation, collection, indexing, co-design, research and presentation of Dresden's cultural heritage and history. The Fachhochschule Dresden, the Academy of Fine Arts Dresden, the Saxon State and University Library, the Leibniz Institute of Ecological Urban and Regional Development and the Dresden City Museum are already involved.

The Time Machine project is also linked to the local Scientific Area Network (SAN) IV "Perspectives on Materiality in Art & Design" of the DRESDEN-concept network, where questions on the digitisation and restoration of objects and materials of cultural heritage using state-of-the-art technologies are pursued in close coordination.

Unleashing Big Data of the Past – Europe builds a Time Machine

The European Commission has chosen Time Machine as one of the six proposals retained for preparing large scale research initiatives to be strategically developed in the next decade. €1 million in funding has been granted for preparing the detailed roadmaps of this initiative that aims at extracting and utilising the Big Data of the past. Time Machine foresees to design and implement advanced new digitisation and Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies to mine Europe’s vast cultural heritage, providing fair and free access to information that will support future scientific and technological developments in Europe.

One of the most advanced Artificial Intelligence systems ever built

The Time Machine will create advanced AI technologies to make sense of vast amounts of information from complex historical data sets. This will enable the transformation of fragmented data – with content ranging from medieval manuscripts and historical objects to smartphone and satellite images – into useable knowledge for industry. In essence, a large-scale computing and digitisation infrastructure will map Europe’s entire social, cultural and geographical evolution. Considering the unprecedented scale and complexity of the data, The Time Machine’s AI even has the potential to create a strong competitive advantage for Europe in the global AI race.

“Time Machine is likely to become one of the most advanced Artificial Intelligence systems ever built, trained on data from wider geographical and temporal horizons”, explains Frederic Kaplan, Professor of Digital Humanities at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Coordinator of the Time Machine Project.

Cultural Heritage as a valuable economic asset

Cultural Heritage is one of our most precious assets, and the Time Machine’s ten-year research and innovation program will strive to show that rather than being a cost, cultural heritage investment will actually be an important economic driver across industries. This constant source of new knowledge will be an economic motor, giving rise to new professions, services and products in areas such as education, creative industries, policy making, smart tourism, smart cities and environmental modelling.

For example, services for comparing territorial configurations across space and time will become an essential tool in developing modern land use policy or city planning. Likewise, the tourism industry will be transformed by professionals capable of creating and managing newly possible experiences at the intersection of the digital and physical world. These industries will have a pan-European platform for knowledge exchange which will add a new dimension to their strategic planning and innovation capabilities.

A new age for Social Sciences and Humanities

Time Machine will mark a new age for Social Sciences and Humanities, as it will offer open access to Europe’s past via unified data and new AI services. This will give “super powers” to researchers by revolutionising the individual researcher’s search capabilities, drastically raising the overall scale and scope of social sciences and humanities research. The resulting knowledge will enable the field to effectively contribute to the development of strategic answers to major pan-European challenges such as sustainable growth, social welfare, migration and integration of migrants, and the safeguarding of European democracy.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Dr. Sander Münster
Visiting Professor for Didactics of Computer Science
Head of Department for Media Design and Production
Technische Universität Dresden
Tel.: +49 351 463-32530
Email: sander.muenster@tu-dresden.de

Kevin Baumer
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
Email: kevin.baumer@epfl.ch

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.timemachine.eu

Kim-Astrid Magister | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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