Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Targeted video surveillance in the soccer stadium

20.02.2013
At the end of 2012 the German Soccer League's paper on safety was adopted. It envisages, among other things, improving video surveillance in stadiums.

The second-generation Vigilant Eye System can help achieve this aim. This enhanced product from Fraunhofer FIT uses synchronized fixed surveillance cameras and rapid zoom cameras which provide detailed images to clearly identify culprits.


Vigilant Eye System with one active dome camera: top left the overview image, top right the image from the active camera; bottom right digital zoom image of the section highlighted in the red box, which allows individuals to be identified.
Photo: Fraunhofer FIT

Specialized image analysis algorithms allow the system to automatically detect the use of flares at an early stage and pick out other salient events. The system points out critical situations to surveillance personnel and automatically records high-resolution video footage that can be used in evidence.

Calls are growing for tighter video surveillance in German soccer stadiums. Following the adoption of the German Soccer League’s paper on safety in December 2012, Hesse Interior Minister Boris Rhein is now calling for stadium bans to be imposed on those fans caught throwing flares and fireworks following crowd trouble during the second leg match between Leverkusen and Frankfurt.

In an interview with the dpa press agency, he announced that stadium surveillance would be tightened. Many observers, however, doubt whether these measures will actually defuse the situation inside stadiums. Others hope that improved video surveillance technology will identify the actual culprits in the stadium so that blanket punishments imposed on clubs, such as the exclusion of supporters for certain matches or fines, can be avoided. The enhanced Vigilant Eye System from Fraunhofer FIT is a step in this direction. The system has been tested successfully in the AFG Arena in St. Gallen, Switzerland, under real-life conditions.

A basic system uses a fixed surveillance camera, which covers a certain section of the stadium, and either one or two active dome cameras, which can very quickly pinpoint and zoom into scenes in the surveillance area. The Vigilant Eye System synchronizes the cameras with each other. If the operator chooses a certain spot in the overview image using the touchscreen, both cameras immediately lock onto this position. By properly positioning the zoom cameras, situations obscured from the front can also be recorded, such as where flags or crowds of people obscure the view. In other words, where the operator manually adjusts one active camera, the other active camera moves accordingly to provide the best image.

The Vigilant Eye System specifically helps security personnel to investigate suspicious scenes by automatically identifying suspicious situations in the overview image in real time and drawing the operator’s attention to these incidents. The system is far more capable than a human observer in this respect, who by their very nature can only scrutinize limited sections of the entire area and may quickly suffer the effects of fatigue.

The system is also specifically programmed to pick out flares and fireworks. All the image data from the active dome camera is recorded in high resolution at 12 frames per second. "The image resolution meets all the requirements for proof of identity and the preservation of video evidence. The achieved zoom levels are currently unrivaled on the market," says Dr. Martina Kolesnik, research scientist at Fraunhofer FIT. The exact position of the individual zoomed images in the overview image is also stored.

When using two dome cameras, the Vigilant Eye System provides the operator with four separate views of the events. The operator sees the image from the fixed surveillance camera in one screen window. Two other windows show the optically zoomed images from the dome cameras. A fourth window can be used to display manually chosen areas of any of the dome camera images using the maximum digital zoom resolution. This enables individuals to be identified and the footage to be used as video evidence. The operator can take specific action to view a scene from various angles using the digital zoom, toggling between the two active cameras in fractions of a second by touchscreen operation of the three windows from the fixed and dome cameras. He can also alter the position and zoom level of the active cameras in this way. Alternatively, the cameras can be controlled using a mouse.

Apart from use in stadiums, the Vigilant Eye System can also be used for security surveillance in buildings, entrance areas, streets, car parks, or restricted areas. It automatically detects security-relevant scenes and stores high-resolution images of these scenes.

Contact:
Alex Deeg
pr@fit.fraunhofer.de
Phone +49 2241 14-2208

Alex Deeg | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.fit.fraunhofer.de/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht German Research Foundation supports new theoretical physics project at Jacobs University Bremen
18.12.2018 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

nachricht New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions
12.12.2018 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Artificial intelligence meets materials science

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Gut microbiome regulates the intestinal immune system, researchers find

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>