Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

13.08.2018

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year. This will require new technical solutions for charging infrastructure: charging should take place as quickly as possible and, as far as possible, without the driver’s involvement.


With the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system for e-vehicles researchers from TU Graz and industry partners have unveiled a world first

© FTG - TU Graz


The comfort charging system is designed for use with standard charging plugs (CCS), meaning that no specific vehicle adaptations are necessary.

© FTG - TU Graz

Researchers at TU Graz’s Institute of Automotive Engineering have now developed an automated, conductive – in other words, cable-based – robotic system that for the first time allows for charging of different vehicles entering the charging space one after the other.

The comfort charging system is designed for use with standard charging plugs (CCS), meaning that no specific vehicle adaptations are necessary. The project partners were BMW AG, headquartered in Munich; MAGNA Steyr Engineering Graz; Linz-based automation specialists KEBA and the Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers (ÖVK) in Vienna.

Bernhard Walzel, who oversees this research focus at TU Graz as part of his dissertation, explains the revolutionary methodology: “For the first time we have found a way to automatically recharge several vehicles, one after another, using a robotic charging station, without the need to adapt the vehicles. The robot recognises the charging socket by means of sophisticated camera technology and can charge several e-cars in sequence after they drive into the charging station. Problems associated with the vehicle’s parking positioning on the station were solved, so the system still works even when a vehicle is not parked in an exact position.”

As Walzel points out, another unique feature is that the robot can operate in various light conditions indoors as well as outdoors.

Automated conductive charging of e-vehicles

A major challenge facing the researchers was programming and integrating sensor technology to identify the exact position and type of vehicle and charging socket. Working in close collaboration with the Institute of Computer Graphics and Vision at TU Graz, the robotic charging system was fitted with several cameras. These recognise the position and type of the charging socket and inform the robot where to plug in the charging cable.

The aim was to design the sensors and charging robot in such a way that it was suited to use with various vehicle types and parking positions, without the need for any changes to the vehicle itself. This means the system can operate with all standard charging plugs. In order to solve the problem, the researchers devised a complex mechatronic system consisting of sensors, robot kinematics and robot control elements.

The technology developed in Graz is designed for automated high-capacity charging of e-vehicles, supplying them with sufficient power to cover long distances; charging lasts only a few minutes. Such high-capacity charging requires innovative liquid-cooled plugs and cables, which can be easily connected to the vehicle using the robot-controlled rapid charging system. The technology also provides a solution that could be implemented for fully automated parking and charging of e-vehicles in future.

The charging system design and experiments on sensor technologies were carried out as part of contract research commissioned by the Austrian Society of Automotive Engineers (ÖVK). The prototyping and testing of the charging system formed part of a project entitled “KoMoT – Komfortable Mobilität mittels Technologieintegration” (“convenient mobility by means of technology integration”). Funding was provided by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) and the Austrian Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (bmvit).

This research area is anchored in the Field of Expertise "Mobility & Production", one of five strategic research FoE of TU Graz.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Bernhard WALZEL, Dipl.-Ing.
Helmut BRUNNER, Dipl.-Ing.
Mario HIRZ, Associate Prof. Dr.
TU Graz | Institute of Automotive Engineering
Inffeldgasse 11/II, 8010 Graz
Tel.: +43 316 873 35278
Mobil: +43 660 4840492
bernhard.walzel@tugraz.at

Weitere Informationen:

https://youtu.be/QlJiWI92Jso
http://www.presse.tugraz.at

Barbara Gigler | Technische Universität Graz

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Predictive touch response mechanism is a step toward a tactile internet
24.01.2020 | The Optical Society

nachricht The easy route the easy way: New chip calculates the shortest distance in an instant
23.01.2020 | Tokyo University of Science

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Integrate Micro Chips for electronic Skin

Researchers from Dresden and Osaka present the first fully integrated flexible electronics made of magnetic sensors and organic circuits which opens the path towards the development of electronic skin.

Human skin is a fascinating and multifunctional organ with unique properties originating from its flexible and compliant nature. It allows for interfacing with...

Im Focus: Dresden researchers discover resistance mechanism in aggressive cancer

Protease blocks guardian function against uncontrolled cell division

Researchers of the Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital Dresden at the National Center for Tumor Diseases Dresden (NCT/UCC), together with an international...

Im Focus: New roles found for Huntington's disease protein

Crucial role in synapse formation could be new avenue toward treatment

A Duke University research team has identified a new function of a gene called huntingtin, a mutation of which underlies the progressive neurodegenerative...

Im Focus: A new look at 'strange metals'

For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals". Now a breakthrough has been achieved. The results have been published in "Science".

Superconductors allow electrical current to flow without any resistance - but only below a certain critical temperature. Many materials have to be cooled down...

Im Focus: Programmable nests for cells

KIT researchers develop novel composites of DNA, silica particles, and carbon nanotubes -- Properties can be tailored to various applications

Using DNA, smallest silica particles, and carbon nanotubes, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed novel programmable materials....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

„Advanced Battery Power“- Conference, Contributions are welcome!

07.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers discover vaccine to strengthen the immune system of plants

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

Brain-cell helpers powered by norepinephrine during fear-memory formation

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

Engineered capillaries model traffic in tiny blood vessels

24.01.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>