Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Waving goodbye to the blue screen

26.05.2004


System crashes are not only annoying, they can bring a company to its knees. So IT specialists will welcome a way to measure the dependability of standard operating systems (OS). After conducting hundreds of computer-stress experiments, a European consortium has developed a new benchmarking method for commercial and open source systems.



Gone are the days when performance was all that mattered. What information technology people want - but rarely get - is a reliable system. Especially now that system developers are increasingly using off-the-shelf operating systems for all their needs, including critical applications.

Two papers have emerged from recent dependability benchmarking tests on the Microsoft Windows family. The first is on Windows 2000, the goal being to define the benchmarking principles and to check them. Paper two, published by the IEEE Computer Society Press in June 2004, also includes Windows NT4 and Windows XP.


"We compared these systems’ erroneous behaviour at the application layer," says Karama Kanoun, coordinator of the IST project DBench, which oversaw the tests. She says the dependability benchmark addresses three complementary measures: robustness, OS reaction time and OS restart time. Together these measurements can characterise a system’s behaviour in the presence of application software faults. The project focused on the user, such as system developers, who need dependability benchmarks to pick the best systems for their requirements.

The experiments involved a remote machine, the Benchmark Controller, linked to the computer running the operating system under test and a third machine that ran the workload (a database management application). The Benchmark Controller diagnosed and collected data whenever the operating system experienced an anomaly.

So what did the tests on the three Windows systems reveal? "In terms of robustness, they behave similarly," says Kanoun. "But there was a noticeable difference in OS reaction and restart times: XP has the shortest reaction and restart times, followed by Windows NT, then Windows 2000." The project partners also noted that the application state at the end of the experiment (mainly the hang and abort states) significantly impacts the restart time for the three operating systems.

The coordinator believes that this dependability benchmarking, done in Europe and further afield, was a world first: "People previously focused on validating operating systems. Now the IT world can compare these systems in a standard way." Also original was the way the tests looked at response times in the presence of faults.

She hopes the project’s results will accelerate the introduction of international standardisation bodies for dependability benchmarking, possibly within five years. The process is already gaining momentum, thanks to the Dependability Benchmarking Special Interest Group. Created in 1999, when DBENCH was starting, this group is made up of major IT players from the United States and Europe.

The project looked at four kinds of system, in the space, automotive and enterprise fields: general-purpose operating systems, Real-Time Kernels, applications and Online Transaction Processing. According to Kanoun, companies such as IBM, Sun Microsystems and Intel are now doing dependability benchmarking on e-commerce and Web applications, encouraged by some of the results emerging from DBENCH. Some of the project partners are also looking at Linux systems.

Contact:
Ms Karama Kanoun
Laas-CNRS
7 Avenue Colonel Roche
F-31077 Toulouse Cedex 4
France
Tel: +33-5-61332600
Email: karama.kanoun@laas.fr

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&ID=65215

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions
12.12.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs
11.12.2018 | National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magic number colloidal clusters

13.12.2018 | Life Sciences

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

13.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>