Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Infineon develops chip network for textiles - Intelligence by the meter

05.05.2003


Researchers from Infineon Technologies AG have developed a way to make large textile surfaces such as carpeting or tent cloth “intelligent”. This technology innovation may lead to new products for the monitoring of buildings, the structural control of buildings of all kinds and for use in the advertising industry.





Woven into fabrics, a self-organizing network of robust chips is able to monitor temperatures, pressures or vibrations as required. In addition to the sensor functionality, the fabric can be equipped with tiny light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to provide directional guidance or serve as advertising material. In this manner, the “intelligent” fabric could be used as a motion sensor or fire alarm, or to control burglar alarm and air-conditioning systems. Infineon plans to further develop this technology for the integration of microelectronics in textile surfaces into a fully functional, large-scale “intelligent” fabric over the next two years, together with cooperation partners from the textile industry.

The “intelligent” textiles hardly miss a thing


The microelectronics modules in the concept demonstrator of an “intelligent” floor covering are embedded in the textile structure in the form of a checkerboard. Each chip is connected to its four adjacent “neighbors” by electrically conductive threads, which creates a network that enables the flow of information. The information is forwarded between the chips and can be transmitted to various systems such as fire-alarms, burglar alarm or air-conditioning systems via a data interface. In this manner, an “intelligent” carpeting could e.g. tell the alarm system where a person is located in a room and in which direction he/she is moving. Equipped with woven-in and individually controlled LEDs, the carpet can serve as a guidance system, e.g. to guide visitor streams through public buildings or to direct them to emergency exits if a dangerous situation arises.

The basic technology also can be used in the construction industry or in the production of Zeppelins (airships), balloon envelopes and tent-cloth. Additionally, the water- and heat-resistant chips can be used as sensors in various support structures, such as columns or walls envelopes. The chips can gather information about the condition and the loading of materials, thus permitting the early identification of local defects, breakage or cracks in construction materials or fabrics. This can increase building safety because the detection of defects is no longer limited to individually initiated point inspections. Another potential application would be based on the integration of individually controllable LEDs in Zeppelin (airship) and balloon envelopes or in flags and tent walls, permitting these materials to carry advertising or directional messages.

Robust functionality through self-organization and fault tolerance

Each chip automatically determines its position within the network within fractions of a second after initialization. It is connected to its four immediate chip neighbors by electrically conductive threads and exchanges information with them. This creates a neural, i.e. self-learning network that is even fault-tolerant. If a chip or conductive path fails, the network will automatically locate this fault and immediately reorganize itself: It will find a new path within the overall system via the neighboring chips in order to maintain the information flow. This offers the possibility to cut the “intelligent” carpeting to virtually any shape and size without damaging the electronic network function. The chips can be placed with any spacing between them; however, the closer together they are woven into the textile structure, the more accurate they will work.

Reiner Schoenrock | Infineon Technologies AG
Further information:
http://www.infineon.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Earthquake researchers finalists for supercomputing prize
19.11.2018 | University of Tokyo

nachricht Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers
15.11.2018 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

When AI and optoelectronics meet: Researchers take control of light properties

20.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease

20.11.2018 | Medical Engineering

How to melt gold at room temperature

20.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>