Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New computer system solves problems by tricking computers

17.09.2002


If people were computers, Srinidhi Varadarajan of Virginia Tech’s Department of Computer Science could enable them to go back to their youth to correct mistakes they made, adapt a jet engine to run a car, or change a part from one SUV engine to another as both vehicles sped down a highway side by side.

Of course, people aren’t computers and don’t need to do those things, but computers need to do equivalent processes. Varadarajan has come up with a computer technology he calls "Weaves" that allows the programmer to use a code in any programming language and convert it to a form similar to object-oriented programming. Weaves teachnology is used to create a virtual world that tricks the software into thinking it is in the real world.

The global computer network--the Internet--has doubled every year for nearly 20 years. The problem is how to test new pieces of network software on such a grand scale. The traditional method is through computer simulation, such as the model of a jet cockpit in which beginning pilots start to learn how to fly a plane. But simulation requires rewriting the software in a different form to test it, as the original cannot be tested. That creates two different versions, and there is no formal mechanism to ensure the equivalence of the test with the real thing, Varadarajan said.



Another method is emulation, or the direct testing of the original software. That way, the programmer can write a piece of software once and not have to rewrite it for simulation testing. The main problem with emulation is a lower degree of control than simulation.

"Why not create a virtual world to make software think it is in the real world?" , Varadarajan asked.,

Weaves can support both simulation and emulation testing, which was Varadarajan’s first goal. "You can’t test a piece of network software on 200-million computers," he said. Or even 5,000 computers. "But we can create hundreds of thousands of virtual machines that make software think it’s running on a very large-scale network. This leads to the creation of a virtual Internet."

Weaves can do all the things existing systems can do and more without asking software programmers to write code specifically for Weaves. "They just write it as they usually do and we take it," Varadarajan said. Then, through reverse analysis, Weaves can make any language look the same.

Also, Weaves allows for mistakes. "In each step in life, we take steps based on what we know," Varadarajan said. "If we realize we made a mistake and want to go back and undo it, we have to remember all the steps we took that caused the mistake." On the computer, the program must also remember all the steps made leading up to a mistake. "Trying to save all the information is very hard," Varadarajan said. "We are trying to make Netscape work without knowing the steps that lead up to the mistake. Weaves automatically does this. It records and saves data and shows what we need to go back in time to change." Thus the system allows for the weaving together of the languages and codes and for fast automatic checkpointing and recovery with no application support.

With a National Science Foundation CAREER award of $400,000 over five years for his proposal, "Weaving a Code Tapestry: A Compiler Directed Framework for Scalable Network Emulation," Varadarajan will continue his research, using "a novel vertical integration of the compiler-generated object framework, operating system and compiler support for fast and memory-efficient checkpointing, and a new adaptive time window based on parallel discrete event simulation algorithm, all of which work in conjunction."

"This synergy creates a new object-based framework for the development of large-scale simulations using code composition, without restricting the application programmer to any language or programming paradigm," Varadarajan said. This would be analogous to enabling a person to adapt a jet engine to work in a car or exchange parts in two fast-moving vehicles without stopping them.

As the educational component of the CAREER award, Varadarajan will develop learning modules to augment the simulation-based projects used in networking courses across the country to save students from spending an inordinate amount of time learning the intricacies of working in a simulation environment.


PR CONTACT: Sally Harris 540-231-6759 slharris@vt.edu
Researcher: Srinidhi Varadarajan, 540-231-5275, srinidhi@vt.edu

Srinidhi Varadarajan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.technews.vt.edu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise
17.07.2018 | University of Wisconsin-Madison

nachricht Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers
17.07.2018 | University of Colorado at Boulder

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

17.07.2018 | Information Technology

In borophene, boundaries are no barrier

17.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

The role of Sodium for the Enhancement of Solar Cells

17.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>