Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New intrusion tolerance software fortifies server security

19.06.2008
In spite of increased focus and large investments in computer security, critical infrastructure systems remain vulnerable to attacks, says Arun Sood, professor of computer science at George Mason University.

The increasing sophistication and incessant morphing of cyber-attacks lend importance to the concept of intrusion tolerance: a system must fend off, or at least limit, the damage caused by unknown and/or undetected attacks.

“The problem is that no matter how much investment is made in intrusion prevention and detection, intruders will still manage to break through and trespass on computer servers,” says Sood. “By looking at this problem from a different angle, we developed a way to contain the losses that may occur because of an intrusion.”

Sood, who is the director of the Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Computer Science at Mason, along with Yin Huang, senior research scientist in the Center for Secure Information Systems at Mason, created the Self Cleansing Intrusion Tolerance (SCIT) technology to provide an additional layer of defense to security architecture with firewalls and intrusion prevention and detection systems. While typical approaches to computer security are reactive and require prior knowledge of all attack modalities and software vulnerabilities, intrusion tolerance is a proactive approach to security.

In the SCIT approach, a server that has been online is assumed to have been compromised. SCIT servers are focused on limiting the losses that can occur because of an external intrusion, and achieve this goal by limiting the exposure time of the server to the Internet. Exposure time is defined as the duration of time that a server is continuously connected to the Internet. Through the use of virtualization technology, duplicate servers are created and an online server is periodically cleansed and restored to a known clean state, regardless of whether an intrusion has been detected. These regular cleansings take place in sub-minute intervals.

“This approach of regular cleansings, when coupled with existing intrusion prevention and detection systems, leads to increased overall security,” says Sood. “We know that intrusion detection systems can detect sudden increases in data throughput from a server, so to avoid detection, hackers steal data at low rates. SCIT interrupts the flow of data regularly and automatically, and the data ex-filtration process is interrupted every cleansing cycle. Thus, SCIT, in partnership with intrusion detection systems, limits the volume of data that can be stolen.”

By reducing exposure time, SCIT provides an additional level of protection while efforts are ongoing to find and fix vulnerabilities and correct configuration errors.

SCIT was funded by the Center for Innovative Technology (in partnership with Northrop Grumman), Lockheed Martin, National Institute of Standards and Technology through the Critical Infrastructure Protection Program, Sun Microsystems and the U.S. Army’s Telemedicine and Technology Research Center. Four patents are pending on the SCIT technology.

About The Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering

Since its founding, The Volgenau School of Information Technology and Engineering has enjoyed more than 20 years of significant accomplishments, including being the first in the nation to establish a PhD program in information technology and becoming a nationally recognized leader in several important research areas. The school’s award-winning faculty, along with its relationship with the Washington, D.C., metro area technology industry, is fundamental to its success. Through partnerships with a wide range of companies and individuals, the Volgenau School is always working to identify next-generation technology and how it can meet the needs of industry and better serve the community, the region and the nation.

About George Mason University

George Mason University, located in the heart of Northern Virginia’s technology corridor near Washington, D.C., is an innovative, entrepreneurial institution with national distinction in a range of academic fields. With strong undergraduate and graduate degree programs in engineering, information technology, biotechnology and health care, Mason prepares its students to succeed in the work force and meet the needs of the region and the world. Mason professors conduct groundbreaking research in areas such as cancer, climate change, information technology and the biosciences, and Mason’s Center for the Arts brings world-renowned artists, musicians and actors to its stage. Its School of Law is recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 40 law schools in the United States.

Jennifer Edgerly | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gmu.edu

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht 'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone
14.08.2018 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic
14.08.2018 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

Im Focus: Lining up surprising behaviors of superconductor with one of the world's strongest magnets

Scientists have discovered that the electrical resistance of a copper-oxide compound depends on the magnetic field in a very unusual way -- a finding that could help direct the search for materials that can perfectly conduct electricity at room temperatur

What happens when really powerful magnets--capable of producing magnetic fields nearly two million times stronger than Earth's--are applied to materials that...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

2018 Work Research Conference

25.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

15.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Diving robots find Antarctic winter seas exhale surprising amounts of carbon dioxide

15.08.2018 | Earth Sciences

Early opaque universe linked to galaxy scarcity

15.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>