Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

AI Hits The Ice

08.03.2018

The curling robot "Curly" is the first AI-based robot to demonstrate competitive curling skills in an icy real environment with its high uncertainties

Scientists from seven different Korean research institutions including Prof. Klaus-Robert Müller, head of the machine-learning group at TU Berlin and guest professor at Korea University, have developed an AI-based curling robot.


© Korea University


© Korea University

“Curly” masters the extremely complex sport on a level that is at least similar to a highly skilled amateur. On March 8, 2018, Korea University will demonstrate the robot’s skills to the public at Icheon Training Center of the Korea Paralympic Committee. As one of the highlights, “Curly” will compete with a human team from Chuncheon Machinery Industry High School following the rules of Olympic curling.

AI-based systems have demonstrated a surprising versatility not only for standard tasks of automation, but also for complex decision-making. AI has already entered many spheres of our daily lives, for instance when using search, recommendation or translation tools or online services.

Prominent AI-applications include strategic games, such as Go, Poker or Atari; but these mainly take place in virtual worlds and have access to arbitrary large amounts of data. Beyond the virtual world, how to optimally have an AI-based system interact with the real world and it’s uncertainties still poses a major challenge. First successful steps have been taken for example in robotics (see “RoboCup”) or self-driving vehicles. However, optimal interaction with the strong uncertainties of the real world while incorporating complex planning and decision-making still remains a complex and essentially unsolved problem.

The AI-based curling robot “Curly” tackles all of the challenges outlined above. Curling is a highly strategic game of combinatorial complexity – in principle even surpassing the game of “Go” in this respect, as all states are continuous. Optimal reaction to the often unforeseen moves of the opponent is crucial. Moreover, curling is played on a slippery surface, a sheet of ice.

Both the robot control for throwing a stone and the physics engine simulating the stone trajectory need to be calibrated in order to effectively compensate nonlinear friction effects and uncertainties arising from the slippery icy surface. Heterogeneous ice conditions and the systematic impossibility to assess them in detail further add to the challenge of this Olympic discipline as well as the fact that all strategic decision-making, planning, estimation while synchronizing between agents and robot control need not only to be performed within real-time constraints but also under high uncertainties. Lastly, the data available to train the deep neural network-learning component and to calibrate the overall real system is limited.

The AI-based curling robot has demonstrated the ability to master the complex game of curling astonishingly well, notably on a level that is similar to a highly skilled amateur. “The innovative challenge that 'Curly' needs to master is the interaction with an environment which is defined by extreme uncertainties. Despite the slippery surface, 'Curly' is able to plan and play well using innovative deep learning and AI techniques,” says Professor Klaus-Robert Müller, TU Berlin and Korea University.

“Superb technical challenges of this interesting real-world problem needed to be overcome by our interdisciplinary team and it is exciting to see possible future developments of such complex AI-based systems interacting with the real-world, with its large uncertainties, beyond curling,” adds Professor Seong-Whan Lee from Korea University.

“Curly” was developed by seven research institutes (서울시컬링연맹, DGIST, UNIST, 영남대학교, NT로봇, 도전하는사람들, 마농탄토) and was funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT (MSIT).

Image downloads (March 8, 2018, 7:00 am CET):
http://www.tu-berlin.de/?id=193552

For further information please contact:
Prof. Dr. Klaus-Robert Müller
TU Berlin
Phone: +49-30-314-78620
E-Mail: klaus-robert.mueller@tu-berlin.de

Stefanie Terp | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft
Further information:
http://www.tu-berlin.de

Further reports about: Curly deep learning future developments icy surface virtual world

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht CubeSats prove their worth for scientific missions
17.04.2019 | American Physical Society

nachricht Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications
12.04.2019 | University of California - Berkeley

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

Im Focus: Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties

Engineers create novel optical devices, including a moth eye-inspired omnidirectional microwave antenna

A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>