Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A webcam is enough to produce a real-time 3D model of a moving hand

08.06.2018

Capturing hand and finger movements within milliseconds is becoming increasingly important for many applications, from virtual reality to human-machine interaction and Industry 4.0. So far, it has required enormous technical effort, which in turn has limited the possible applications. Computer scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Informatics have now developed a software system that requires only the built-in camera of a laptop, due to the interaction of various neural networks. For the first time, the researchers will be presenting the program at stand G75 in hall 27 of the computer fair Cebit, which will take place in Hannover from June 11th onward.

If the computer scientist Franziska Müller holds her hand in front of the laptop camera, the hand's virtual counterpart appears on the screen. Immediately this is overlaid by a colorful virtual hand skeleton. No matter what movements Müller's hand makes in front of the webcam, the colored bones of the model do the same.


Franziska Müller, Max Planck Institute for Informatics, has developed a software system that requires only the built-in camera of a laptop to produce a real-time 3D model of a moving hand.

Oliver Dietze

Müller demonstrates the software she developed together with Professor Christian Theobalt and other researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Computer Science in Saarbrücken, Stanford University and the Spanish King Juan Carlos University. So far no other software can do this with such a low-cost camera.

Since it works in almost every kind of filmed scene, it can be used anywhere, and thus trumps previous approaches that require a depth camera or multiple cameras.

The algorithm, with which the software transforms the two-dimensional information of the video image in real time into the three-dimensional movement model of the hand’s bones, is based on a special kind of neural network: a so-called "convolutional neural network" or CNN for short.

The researchers have trained it to detect the bones of the hand. They have generated the necessary training data with another neural network. The result: The software calculates the exact 3D poses of the hand’s bones in milliseconds.

Even if some of them are occluded, for example by an apple being held in the hand, this does not affect the software. Only several hands working together still confuse the software. Solving this is the researchers' next goal.

More information:
http://handtracker.mpi-inf.mpg.de/projects/GANeratedHands/

Press photos: www.uni-saarland.de/pressefotos

Questions can be directed to:
Franziska Müller
Max Planck Institute for Informatics
Saarland Informatics Campus E1.4
E-mail: frmueller@mpi-inf.mpg.de
Phone: +49 681 9325 4057

Editor:
Gordon Bolduan
Science Communication
Competence Center Computer Science Saarland
Saarland Informatics Campus
E-mail: bolduan@mmci.uni-saarland.de
Phone: +49 681 302 70741

Friederike Meyer zu Tittingdorf | Universität des Saarlandes

Further reports about: 3D Max Planck Institute movements multiple cameras neural network

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions
12.12.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs
11.12.2018 | National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magic number colloidal clusters

13.12.2018 | Life Sciences

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

13.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>