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PCST-10 international conference

07.04.2008
Key speakers and seminars announced Scandinavian conference to highlight new science communication trends

The 10th annual Public Communication of Science and Technology (PCST) international conference is soon upon us, and now is the time for delegates and press to register. Don't miss out on this great opportunity to learn how science communication can contribute to sustainable development, and experience how science communication can be made stronger and more effective.

The PCST conference will also be a great opportunity to network with peers within the science communication field. It is open to anyone interested in science, and a multi-disciplinary approach will characterise the whole conference.

Celebrated key speakers
Speakers at the PCST conference, taking place on 25-27 June, 2008 include Diego Golombeck, a scientist from Argentina specialising in science communication, and Anja C. Andersen, an astrophysicist at Dark Cosmology Centre at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Anja C. Andersen - winner of the prestigious Descartes Prize for Research in 2007 - is widely known as an excellent communicator of science to the public as well as an enthusiastic advocate of women's participation in the natural sciences.

"Science communication is an important part of science. The PCST conference will be a great opportunity to network with key contacts within the science and technology communities, as well as explore the cities of Malmö, Lund and Copenhagen - all prominent cities within academia, research and innovation," Andersen said.

Key seminars at the conference include

- Framing climate change and other controversial science communication topics

- European trends and challenges in science journalism

- Medical messages in the media: reliable information or science for sale?

- Science communication transcending language barriers

- Visualisation in science and public communication

- The public engagement of science and web 2.0

- Evaluating public engagement in science: why, how, and for whom?

The PCST conference takes place in Malmö and Lund in Sweden and Copenhagen in neighbouring Denmark. It will bring together some 400 delegates, including science communicators, researchers, science writers, press officers and librarians, from all over the world. Nearly 300 proposals from all parts of the world have been selected for the final programme and some 70 sessions will be taking place during the course of the week.

There's also an opportunity for delegates to visit Stockholm during the pre-conference on 23-24 June. Learn more about how Nobel Prize candidates are selected and visit the Nobel Museum.

To register for the PCST international conference, please visit: http://www.pcst-10.org

For further information, please contact:

Annakarin Svenningsson
Press officer
Swedish Research Council
Tel: +46 (0)8 546 442 19
Mobile: +46 (0)73 355 38 54
Email: anna.karin.svenningsson@vr.se
Eva Nielsen Lind
Press officer
Cloudberry Communications
Tel: +46 (0)8 551 112 12
Mobile: +46 (0)70 305 85 99
Email: eva@cloudberry.se

Anna Karin Svenningsson | idw
Further information:
http://www.pcst-10.org

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