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World Water Day: Disinfection technology tops immediate global water needs

20.03.2013
As March 22 marks World Water Day, Jacob Azran, CEO of Blue I Water Technologies, takes a look at the solutions that are needed to deal with today’s global water crisis. “It is a privilege for Blue I Water Technologies to be playing a role enabling communities around the global village to have access to potable water.”

“Disinfection of water from sources such as rivers, lakes, and wells is becoming one of the most promising solutions to the global water crisis that threatens millions in peripheral villages, non-urban regions, and economically isolated areas every day,” says Jacob Azran, CEO of Blue I Water Technologies.

“Recent studies have set out clear definitions of the world’s water needs today,” Azran explains. “The World Health Organization has suggested that a person’s basic domestic clean water needs amount to between 50 and 100 liters of water a day per capita – for drinking, cooking and sanitation. In many regions around the world, including in India, China, and South America, vast populations are not capable of attaining even these basic domestic water needs, not to mention water for cultural uses and for agriculture, the latter often constituting inhabitants’ sole livelihood. An urgent solution is needed, and water decontamination is being pinpointed as the key on a global level,” explains Azran.

“As the UN’s Millennium Development Goals include greatly increasing the proportion of people who have sustainable access to safe drinking water in the immediate future, the process demands more affordable, simple, and efficient water analysis and monitoring solutions.” According to Azran, accessibility and affordability of advanced water technologies is indeed critical to healing the world’s fresh water shortage.

“It is a privilege for Blue I Water Technologies to be playing a role enabling communities around the global village to have access to potable water. UN-Water has clearly stated that one in six people worldwide does not have access to clean water. Ensuring that a village’s pumped water is clean and balanced is vital in the battle against child mortality, for healthy child development, and in preventing widespread disease. We are thrilled to be providing water disinfection analysis and control solutions in remote villages in India, for example, and to have developed high-precision water monitoring tools that are suitable for use in the developing world.

In many peripheral villages, water can be pumped only for a few hours each day. Because the water is treated for chlorination manually, that small amount of water is sometimes left unfit or unpleasant for consumption. Thanks to systems such as Blue I’s Prizma (an online, test pad- based monitoring system), which requires no technical knowledge to use, the chlorination process is monitored and ensures that whatever water supply is available is completely safe for domestic use.”

Blue I Water Technologies was established in 2003 in Israel, with the development of a number of unique technologies for water quality monitoring and treatment. “Our products are leading global technology in providing of advanced controllers and analyzers for the water treatment market. Blue I devices identify, quantify and analyze the chemical components of water and measure parameters such as Chlorine, pH, Redox, turbidity, conductivity or temperature,” says Azran.

Jacob Azran, formerly a senior staff member at Orbotech, was appointed CEO of Blue I in 2011.

For more information:
Rachel Feldman
Manager - International Public Relations
Strategy & Values Ltd.
Cell: +972 50-444-5249
rachel@shayporat.com

Rachel Feldman | Strategy & Values Ltd.
Further information:
http://www.blueitechnologies.com/

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