Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A technology to safe fish in river from industrial acitvities

15.05.2007
Fish downstream migration is a risky behaviour in rivers bordered by industries abstracting large amount of water for cooling or hydroelectric purposes. As these intakes open generally in direction of the main current channel of the river, fish migrating downstream are often entrained massively towards these sites and suffer high mortality by asphyxia on the filters or by a lethal contact with turbine blades.

This impact has greatly contributed to the decline of fish migratory species, such the European eel or the Atlantic salmon, being both important in fisheries resources. In the particular case of the eel, worldwide threatened, the cumulative mortality of adult downstream migrating in large rivers towards the sea can exceed 90% due to the succession of industrial water intakes.

This important ecological problem has been legally take into account trough the European Water Framework Directive and the recent European Commission for eel protection, underlining the need to reduce this kind of mortality. Various behavioural barriers have been tested to deflect fish away from a water intake by the use of stimuli like light, sounds, electric fields, bubble curtains, with a relative efficiency.

Today, ProFish Technology, a spin-off of the University of Liège (Belgium) proposes a new concept of fish behavioural barriers based on the emission of infrasounds. This technology has been developed by the University of Oslo, Norway (Prof. O. Sand), and was successfully tested by the University of Liège on a nuclear cooling water intake in Belgium. Based on these encouraging results, Dr. Damien Sonny, fish biologist of the University of Liège and now Director of ProFish Technology, has acquired an exclusive licence from the team of Prof. O. Sand in order to propose infrasounds as an efficient behavioural barrier to industries and rivers managers.

Infrasound are acoustic signals characterised by frequencies below 20 Hz. Infrasounds are natural alarm signals for fish, and the intensity used by the infrasound fish fence of Profish Technology create literally shake the fish, creating an uncomfortable area that they always avoid, with no habituation. Consequently, this system has revealed in the scientific literature the best efficiency results on the largest number of fish species, as observed during the test on the cooling water intake in Belgium where a reduction of 85% of the fish entrained was observed. An adequate location of the infrasound units will thus induce avoidance trajectories of fish. It is possible to adapt the operation of the system to migration periods of target species, in autumn for the downstream run of the eels, or in spring for the migration of the young salmons.

The nuclear power plant of Tihange (Electrabel) in Belgium, that collaborated actively with the University of Liège during the basic research, has shown its interest to the infrasound technology, and by this autumn, several infrasound units will be placed at the mouth of the water intake to keep fish downstream migrating in the main channel of the River Meuse. Electrabel Tihange will be pioneer in the use of infrasound on industrial water intake.

Beside the repulsion technology, ProFish Technology proposes the design and the conception of fish passes, for upstream and downstream migration, addressing solutions to all kind of fish migration problems, with the possibility to use infrasound as a guidance towards fish passes.

By its technology and services, ProFish technology reconciles industrial activities with environment. Several companies have already showed their interest, and some contacts have been taken with Hydroquébec (Québec-Canada), New York Power Authorities (USA), EDF (France) and Shell (Australia).

Didier Moreau | alfa
Further information:
http://www.profish-technology.be

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

Im Focus: Coping with errors in the quantum age

Physicists at ETH Zurich demonstrate how errors that occur during the manipulation of quantum system can be monitored and corrected on the fly

The field of quantum computation has seen tremendous progress in recent years. Bit by bit, quantum devices start to challenge conventional computers, at least...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

14.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

14.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

How algae and carbon fibers could sustainably reduce the athmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

14.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>