Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Engineering takes to the ocean

21.06.2005


Cutting edge research will be on display at The Royal Academy of Engineering’s annual Summer Soirée at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS), on Monday 27 June, hosted by the University of Southampton.



Highlights include:

Ocean floor energy: the University of Southampton and NOCS are at the forefront of research on methane hydrates, ice-like deposits occurring in deep ocean sediments. These show promise as a major source of energy but could also trigger a dramatic acceleration in global warming if their trapped methane was released – they are already implicated in submarine landslides.


The thinking oilman’s seafloor survey: Offshore Hydrocarbon Mapping plc, a spin-out company from the University of Southampton, is pioneering the use of controlled source electromagnetic sounding to test the resistivity of rock structures under the sea bed, which gives a very accurate picture of oil and gas deposits. Used to complement seismic surveys, it is already saving oil companies millions of pounds in offshore test drilling and might be used in future to assess and monitor rock structures during carbon dioxide sequestration. OHM was shortlisted this year for the Academy’s £50,000 MacRobert Award for innovation.

The fibre is listening: the University’s Optoelectronics Research Centre has developed an optical fibre with an integrated vibration sensor that can detect sounds up to 20 metres away from the fibre over a total length of up to 40 kilometres. The system can distinguish simultaneous noises and identify their sources. It is already being used in smart structures to record stresses and also for earthquake monitoring. Another new biosensor chip simultaneously measures 32 different pollutants in real time and is already in use monitoring rivers and coastal waters.

Bubble bubble: the formation of bubbles and violent splashing as waves break transfers energy and mass between the atmosphere and the ocean and understanding this process is important in studying both climate change and coastal erosion. Research at the University’s Institute of Sound and Vibration Research and the School of Civil Engineering and the Environment aims to demystify the turbulent interface between water, air and seashore using novel probes based on optical fibres. Understanding how dolphins manage to use sonar in bubbly water could lead to improved design of human sonar equipment, which is currently limited in turbulent coastal areas.

Virtual Trafalgar: see the Battle of Trafalgar from every angle as you’ve never seen it before. Final year engineering students have developed a virtual maritime environment to create realistic simulations of ships from HMS Victory to modern yachts.

Guest of Honour HRH the Duke of Edinburgh, Senior Fellow of the Academy, will also formally rename the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (formerly the Southampton Oceanography Centre).

Jane Sutton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.raeng.org.uk

More articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation:

nachricht Despite government claims, orangutan populations have not increased. Call for better monitoring
06.11.2018 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems
30.10.2018 | University of Virginia

All articles from Ecology, The Environment and Conservation >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>